3 trainers found

Fields: Infectious Agents  or Environmental Monitoring 


Giorgia Mori

Giorgia is a Data Science Trainer at the Sydney Informatics Hub (SIH), University of Sydney. She has a background in microbiology and bioinformatics. She is a Software, Data and Library Carpentry instructor, and she has been supervising, teaching and training staff and students in the development...

Location: Sydney, Australia

Mori Giorgia giorgia.mori@sydney.edu.au Sydney, Australia Giorgia is a Data Science Trainer at the Sydney Informatics Hub (SIH), University of Sydney. She has a background in microbiology and bioinformatics. She is a Software, Data and Library Carpentry instructor, and she has been supervising, teaching and training staff and students in the development of computational skills for conducting efficient and reproducible research. She volunteers in diversity initiatives (RLadies, PyLadies) to support the representation of gender minorities in the programming community. ["English", "Italian"] https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3469-5632
Robert Clemens

I sit within the EcoCommons Australia team who develop online tools for ecological modelling. We have training in how to learn to code in R or Python, in generating species distribution models or climate projections in an online environment.

Location: Based at Griffith University, EcoCommons Australia is a partnership between multiple organisations who are working to make Ecological modelling and data more FAIR.

Clemens Robert r.clemens@griffith.edu.au Based at Griffith University, EcoCommons Australia is a partnership between multiple organisations who are working to make Ecological modelling and data more FAIR. I sit within the EcoCommons Australia team who develop online tools for ecological modelling. We have training in how to learn to code in R or Python, in generating species distribution models or climate projections in an online environment. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1359-5133
Tim Langlois

Stereo imagery is widely used by research institutions and management bodies around the world as a cost-effective and non-destructive method to research and monitor fish and habitats (Whitmarsh, Fairweather and Huveneers, 2017). Stereo-video can provide accurate and precise size and range...

Location: GitHub

Langlois Tim tim.langlois@uwa.edu.au GitHub Stereo imagery is widely used by research institutions and management bodies around the world as a cost-effective and non-destructive method to research and monitor fish and habitats (Whitmarsh, Fairweather and Huveneers, 2017). Stereo-video can provide accurate and precise size and range measurements and can be used to study spatial and temporal patterns in fish assemblages (McLean et al., 2016), habitat composition and complexity (Collins et al., 2017), behaviour (Goetze et al., 2017), responses to anthropogenic pressures (Bosch et al., 2022) and the recovery and growth of benthic fauna (Langlois et al. 2020). It is important that users of stereo-video collect, annotate, quality control and store their data in a consistent manner, to ensure data produced is of the highest quality possible and to enable large scale collaborations. Here we collate existing best practices and propose new tools to equip ecologists to ensure that all aspects of the stereo-video workflow are performed in a consistent way. ["English", "French"] https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6404-4000