Register training material
335 materials found

HeSANDA Queensland Node - Health Data Australia

Hear Dr Kristan Kang, from the ARDC, speak about the Health Data Australia catalogue.

Keywords: health data, health data, research data

HeSANDA Queensland Node - Health Data Australia https://dresa.org.au/materials/hesanda-queensland-node-health-data-australia Hear Dr Kristan Kang, from the ARDC, speak about the Health Data Australia catalogue. research@healthtranslationqld.org.au health data, health data, research data
HeSANDA Queensland Node - The importance of data sharing

Hear from Professor John Prins, Health Translation Queensland's Executive Director, talk on the importance of data sharing.

Keywords: Data sharing, research data

HeSANDA Queensland Node - The importance of data sharing https://dresa.org.au/materials/hesanda-queensland-node-the-importance-of-data-sharing Hear from Professor John Prins, Health Translation Queensland's Executive Director, talk on the importance of data sharing. research@healthtranslationqld.org.au Data sharing, research data
Introduction to the Five Safes Framework

Resources include:
* Facilitator notes
*PowerPoint presentation
This is an introduction to the Five Safes framework and has been developed for anyone with no or little knowledge of the framework can develop their own workshop.

Keywords: research data management, sensitive data, Five Safes, training material, workshop materials

Introduction to the Five Safes Framework https://dresa.org.au/materials/introduction-to-the-five-safes-framework Resources include: * Facilitator notes *PowerPoint presentation This is an introduction to the Five Safes framework and has been developed for anyone with no or little knowledge of the framework can develop their own workshop. Yolante Jones yolante.jones@anu.edu.au research data management, sensitive data, Five Safes, training material, workshop materials masters ecr phd support professional
Stereo-video workflows for fish and benthic ecologists

Stereo imagery is widely used by research institutions and management bodies around the world as a cost-effective and non-destructive method to research and monitor fish and habitats (Whitmarsh, Fairweather and Huveneers, 2017). Stereo-video can provide accurate and precise size and range...

Keywords: stereo-video, fish, sharks, habitats

Resource type: tutorial

Stereo-video workflows for fish and benthic ecologists https://dresa.org.au/materials/stereo-video-workflows-for-fish-and-benthic-ecologists Stereo imagery is widely used by research institutions and management bodies around the world as a cost-effective and non-destructive method to research and monitor fish and habitats (Whitmarsh, Fairweather and Huveneers, 2017). Stereo-video can provide accurate and precise size and range measurements and can be used to study spatial and temporal patterns in fish assemblages (McLean et al., 2016), habitat composition and complexity (Collins et al., 2017), behaviour (Goetze et al., 2017), responses to anthropogenic pressures (Bosch et al., 2022) and the recovery and growth of benthic fauna (Langlois et al. 2020). It is important that users of stereo-video collect, annotate, quality control and store their data in a consistent manner, to ensure data produced is of the highest quality possible and to enable large scale collaborations. Here we collate existing best practices and propose new tools to equip ecologists to ensure that all aspects of the stereo-video workflow are performed in a consistent way. tim.langlois@uwa.edu.au stereo-video, fish, sharks, habitats
"How To" Video Guide for the Australian Child and Youth Wellbeing Atlas

This "How To" Video Guide for the Australian Child and Youth Wellbeing Atlas covers key features, step-by-step instructions, and screen shots. It assists users in navigating the data platform with 400+ data sets on children and young people's health and wellbeing. The platform offers geospatial...

Keywords: research data, digital research skills, health data, digital research training, Community Connect, ARDC

"How To" Video Guide for the Australian Child and Youth Wellbeing Atlas https://dresa.org.au/materials/how-to-video-guide-for-the-australian-child-and-youth-wellbeing-atlas This "How To" Video Guide for the Australian Child and Youth Wellbeing Atlas covers key features, step-by-step instructions, and screen shots. It assists users in navigating the data platform with 400+ data sets on children and young people's health and wellbeing. The platform offers geospatial visualisations and maps at various geographic levels. A/Prof Rebecca Glauert, UWA, Marketa Reeves, UWA research data, digital research skills, health data, digital research training, Community Connect, ARDC
User Manual for the Australian Child and Youth Wellbeing Atlas

This user manual for the Australian Child and Youth Wellbeing Atlas covers key features of the platform, step-by-step instructions, and screen shots. It assists users in navigating the data platform with 400+ data sets on children and young people's health and wellbeing. The platform offers...

Keywords: research data, health data, digital research skills, digital research training, Community Connect, ARDC

User Manual for the Australian Child and Youth Wellbeing Atlas https://dresa.org.au/materials/user-manual-for-the-australian-child-and-youth-wellbeing-atlas This user manual for the Australian Child and Youth Wellbeing Atlas covers key features of the platform, step-by-step instructions, and screen shots. It assists users in navigating the data platform with 400+ data sets on children and young people's health and wellbeing. The platform offers geospatial visualisations and maps at various geographic levels. A/Prof Rebecca Glauert, UWA, Marketa Reeves, UWA research data, health data, digital research skills, digital research training, Community Connect, ARDC
Using PennyLane on Setonix

Introduction to quantum computing

Keywords: Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, Setonix, quantum, PennyLane

Using PennyLane on Setonix https://dresa.org.au/materials/using-pennylane-on-setonix Introduction to quantum computing training@pawsey.org.au Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, Setonix, quantum, PennyLane
Pawsey: AWS Quantum 101 Using Amazon Braket

Join us as AWS Quantum Specialists introduce quantum simulators and gate-based quantum computers, before turning to more advanced topics.

Keywords: Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, AWS, quantum, HPC

Pawsey: AWS Quantum 101 Using Amazon Braket https://dresa.org.au/materials/pawsey-aws-quantum-101-using-amazon-braket Join us as AWS Quantum Specialists introduce quantum simulators and gate-based quantum computers, before turning to more advanced topics. training@pawsey.org.au Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, AWS, quantum, HPC
HIP Advanced Workshop

Additional topics presented about HIP, covering memory management, kernel optimisation, IO optimisation and porting CUDA to HIP.

Keywords: HIP, Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, supercomputing

HIP Advanced Workshop https://dresa.org.au/materials/hip-advanced-workshop Additional topics presented about HIP, covering memory management, kernel optimisation, IO optimisation and porting CUDA to HIP. training@pawsey.org.au HIP, Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, supercomputing
National Transfusion Dataset Secure eResearch Platform (SeRP)/SafeHaven Training

A short training video for NTD users on how to access and use the SeRP once data access is granted.

Keywords: research data, Data analysis, research data management

National Transfusion Dataset Secure eResearch Platform (SeRP)/SafeHaven Training https://dresa.org.au/materials/national-transfusion-dataset-secure-eresearch-platform-serp-safehaven-training A short training video for NTD users on how to access and use the SeRP once data access is granted. sphpm.ntd@monash.edu research data, Data analysis, research data management
National Transfusion Dataset (NTD) Data Access Request process

A guide and resources on requesting data access from the NTD

Keywords: research data

National Transfusion Dataset (NTD) Data Access Request process https://dresa.org.au/materials/national-transfusion-dataset-ntd-data-access-request-process A guide and resources on requesting data access from the NTD sphpm.ntd@monash.edu research data
National Transfusion Dataset (NTD) Data Extraction Guide

A guide for hospital sites contributing data to the NTD.

Keywords: data management

National Transfusion Dataset (NTD) Data Extraction Guide https://dresa.org.au/materials/national-transfusion-dataset-ntd-data-extraction-guide A guide for hospital sites contributing data to the NTD. sphpm.ntd@monash.edu data management
Presentation of The Australian Companion Animal Registry of Cancers (ACARCinom)

With support from the Australian Research Data Commons (ARDC) through the Australian Data Partnership program, ACARCinom is the first Australia-wide registry of animal cancer occurrences that addresses the gaps in veterinary cancer data registries. ACARCinom aims to make a positive impact on...

Keywords: cancer, data, dog, cat

Presentation of The Australian Companion Animal Registry of Cancers (ACARCinom) https://dresa.org.au/materials/presentation-of-the-australian-companion-animal-registry-of-cancers-acarcinom With support from the Australian Research Data Commons (ARDC) through the Australian Data Partnership program, ACARCinom is the first Australia-wide registry of animal cancer occurrences that addresses the gaps in veterinary cancer data registries. ACARCinom aims to make a positive impact on cancer research for our pets. Having reliable data is crucial for understanding the patterns of cancer and for evaluating treatments in both animals and humans. Five university veterinary schools and Australia's 2 leading veterinary pathology providers are partnering in the ACARCinom project: The University of Queensland, Queensland University of Technology, University of Sydney, Gribbles Veterinary Pathology, IDEXX, University of Adelaide, Murdoch University By uniting the expertise and resources of these institutions, ACARCinom is poised to make significant advancements in understanding and combating cancer in dogs and cats. This project represents a remarkable collaboration that harnesses the power of data to unlock new insights and drive progress in the field of veterinary oncology. This video explains how the ACARCinom Dashboard works and what its functionalities are. You can have access to the ACARCinom database at the following link: acarcinom.org.au Prof Chiara Palmieri School of Veterinary Science The University of Queensland cancer, data, dog, cat masters phd researcher support
Fluoroquinolone antibiotics and Aortic Aneurysm or Dissection 

The main objective of this project was to provide education on the use of data translated to the OMOP common data model. We aimed to showcase how the Atlas interface tool could be used to generate evidence for a highly relevant and significant research question. The clinical question that was...

Keywords: OMOP, Aortic Aneurysm, Fluoroquinolone antibiotics

Fluoroquinolone antibiotics and Aortic Aneurysm or Dissection  https://dresa.org.au/materials/fluoroquinolone-antibiotics-and-aortic-aneurysm-or-dissection The main objective of this project was to provide education on the use of data translated to the OMOP common data model. We aimed to showcase how the Atlas interface tool could be used to generate evidence for a highly relevant and significant research question. The clinical question that was used to demonstrate the process revolved around investigating the potential association between the use of fluoroquinolones to treat urinary tract infection and the risk of experiencing aortic aneurysm and dissection within 30 days, 3 months, or 12 months of treatment initiation compared to other commonly used antibiotics. The workshop aimed to describe how data are translated to the OMOP CDM, how cohorts can be derived in these data, how to execute a robust analysis, and lastly, how to interpret the results of the study. Specifically, we described the process of translating Australian medicines dispensing data to the OMOP CDM, including the translation of the Australia Pharmaceutical Benefits Schedule data to the international RxNorm standard vocabulary. The outcome of the project is an on-line training resource that highlights the process of study execution from start to finish. This training package will serve as an exemplar for researchers in Australia to unlock the value of their data that has been translated into the OMOP CDM. The audience for this project was database programmers, researchers, and decision-makers, and all those interested in using data to inform healthcare. Roger Ward, Nicole Pratt Christine Hallinan OMOP, Aortic Aneurysm, Fluoroquinolone antibiotics
OpenCL

Supercomputers make use of accelerators from a variety of different hardware vendors, using devices such as multi-core CPU’s, GPU’s and even FPGA’s. OpenCL is a way for your HPC application to make effective use of heterogeneous computing devices, and to avoid code refactoring for new HPC...

Keywords: OpenCL, supercomputing, CPUs, GPUs, FPGAs, HPC

OpenCL https://dresa.org.au/materials/opencl-3eabb316-794d-4f46-959a-725be3ae1bde Supercomputers make use of accelerators from a variety of different hardware vendors, using devices such as multi-core CPU’s, GPU’s and even FPGA’s. OpenCL is a way for your HPC application to make effective use of heterogeneous computing devices, and to avoid code refactoring for new HPC infrastructure. Topics covered in this course are : - Introduction to OpenCL - How to build and run applications on Setonix with OpenCL and MPI - Matrix multiplication with OpenCL – fully explained line by line - How to debug OpenCL applications and kernels - Measure performance with OpenCL Events and open source tools - Memory management - Coarse and fine-grained shared memory - Strategies for building optimised OpenCL kernels - Optimise IO performance with asynchronous operations training@pawsey.org.au OpenCL, supercomputing, CPUs, GPUs, FPGAs, HPC
Managing Data using Acacia @ Pawsey

Acacia is Pawsey's "warm tier" or project storage. This object store is fully integrated with Setonix, Pawsey's main supercomputer, enabling fast transfer of data for project use.

These short videos introduce this high-speed object storage for hosting research data online.

Acacia is named...

Keywords: data, data skills, Acacia, Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, object storage, File systems

Managing Data using Acacia @ Pawsey https://dresa.org.au/materials/managing-data-using-acacia-pawsey Acacia is Pawsey's "warm tier" or project storage. This object store is fully integrated with Setonix, Pawsey's main supercomputer, enabling fast transfer of data for project use. These short videos introduce this high-speed object storage for hosting research data online. Acacia is named after Australia’s national floral emblem the Golden Wattle – Acacia pycnantha. training@pawsey.org.au data, data skills, Acacia, Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, object storage, File systems ugrad masters phd ecr researcher support professional
PCon Preparing applications for El Capitan and beyond

As Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL) prepares to stand up its next supercomputer, El Capitan, application teams prepare to pivot to another GPU architecture.

This talk presents how the LLNL application teams made the transition from distributed-memory, CPU-only architectures to...

Keywords: GPUs, supercomputing, HPC, PaCER

PCon Preparing applications for El Capitan and beyond https://dresa.org.au/materials/pcon-preparing-applications-for-el-capitan-and-beyond As Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL) prepares to stand up its next supercomputer, El Capitan, application teams prepare to pivot to another GPU architecture. This talk presents how the LLNL application teams made the transition from distributed-memory, CPU-only architectures to GPUs. They share institutional best practices. They discuss new open-source software products as tools for porting and profiling applications and as avenues for collaboration across the computational science community. Join LLNL's Erik Draeger and Jane Herriman, who presented this talk at Pawsey's PaCER Conference in September 2023. training@pawsey.org.au Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre GPUs, supercomputing, HPC, PaCER masters phd researcher ecr support professional ugrad
OpenCL

Supercomputers make use of accelerators from a variety of different hardware vendors, using devices such as multi-core CPU’s, GPU’s and even FPGA’s. OpenCL is a way for your HPC application to make effective use of heterogeneous computing devices, and to avoid code refactoring for new HPC...

Keywords: supercomputing, Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, CPUs, GPUs, OpenCL, FPGAs

Resource type: activity

OpenCL https://dresa.org.au/materials/opencl Supercomputers make use of accelerators from a variety of different hardware vendors, using devices such as multi-core CPU’s, GPU’s and even FPGA’s. OpenCL is a way for your HPC application to make effective use of heterogeneous computing devices, and to avoid code refactoring for new HPC infrastructure. training@pawsey.org.au Toby Potter supercomputing, Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, CPUs, GPUs, OpenCL, FPGAs masters ecr researcher support
WEBINAR: Getting started with RNAseq: Transforming raw reads into biological insights

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Getting started with RNAseq: Transforming raw reads into biological insights’. This webinar took place on 6 September 2023.

Event description 

RNA sequencing (RNAseq) is a powerful technique for...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Transcriptomics, RNA-seq, RNAseq, Gene expression

WEBINAR: Getting started with RNAseq: Transforming raw reads into biological insights https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-getting-started-with-rnaseq-transforming-raw-reads-into-biological-insights This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Getting started with RNAseq: Transforming raw reads into biological insights’. This webinar took place on 6 September 2023. Event description  RNA sequencing (RNAseq) is a powerful technique for investigating gene expression in biological samples. Processing and analysing RNAseq data involves multiple steps to align raw sequence reads to a reference genome, count the number of reads mapped to each gene, and perform statistical analyses to identify differentially expressed genes and functionally annotate them. RNAseq experiments have many different applications as we apply them to a variety of research questions and organisms. This diversity of applications can make it challenging to appreciate all the design considerations, processing requirements, and limitations of RNAseq experiments as they apply to you. In this webinar, you will gain an understanding of the key considerations for designing and performing your own successful experiments with bulk RNA. We’ll start at the lab bench with RNA extraction, quality control, and library preparation, then move to the sequencing machine where you will make essential decisions about sequencing platforms, optimal sequencing depth, and the importance of replicates. We’ll talk about bioinformatics workflows for RNAseq data processing and the computational requirements of transforming raw sequencing reads to analysis-ready count data. Finally, we’ll discuss how to apply differential expression and functional enrichment analyses to gain biological insights from differentially expressed genes. This webinar was developed by the Sydney Informatics Hub in collaboration with the Australian BioCommons. Training materials Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Getting started with RNAseq: A PDF copy of the slides presented during the webinar. Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/tITR3WR_jWI Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Transcriptomics, RNA-seq, RNAseq, Gene expression
WEBINAR: Managing hands-on data analysis training with Galaxy

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Managing hands-on data analysis training with Galaxy’. This webinar took place on 25 July 2023.

Event description 

Looking for flexible, scalable, real-world solutions that enable data analysis skills to...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Galaxy, Training, Training infrastructure

WEBINAR: Managing hands-on data analysis training with Galaxy https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-managing-hands-on-data-analysis-training-with-galaxy This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Managing hands-on data analysis training with Galaxy’. This webinar took place on 25 July 2023. Event description  Looking for flexible, scalable, real-world solutions that enable data analysis skills to be taught to anyone and anywhere?  Galaxy Australia, a national web service supporting 1000s of bioinformatics tools and workflows is a fantastic solution for training on bioinformatics concepts. Their "Training Infrastructure as a Service”, or TIaaS provides free compute and back-end support for data analysis training. It is paired with 100’s of easy-to-follow tutorials developed and maintained by the worldwide community on the Galaxy Training Network (GTN). TIaaS frees trainers from setting up and maintaining computational resources for their training events so that they can focus on student needs and learning outcomes This webinar will show you how to make the most of Galaxy Australia, TIaaS and the Galaxy Training Network for bioinformatics training. We’ll highlight all the nifty features you can use to plan, manage and deliver training to any size audience efficiently. Materials Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Managing data analysis training with Galaxy_slides: A PDF copy of the slides presented during the webinar. Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/VNE0pF6Nqgw Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Galaxy, Training, Training infrastructure
WORKSHOP: Translating workflows into Nextflow with Janis

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Translating workflows into Nextflow with Janis’. This workshop took place online on 19 June 2023.

Event description

Bioinformatics workflows are critical for reproducibly transferring methodologies...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, CWL, Galaxy

WORKSHOP: Translating workflows into Nextflow with Janis https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-translating-workflows-into-nextflow-with-janis This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Translating workflows into Nextflow with Janis’. This workshop took place online on 19 June 2023. Event description Bioinformatics workflows are critical for reproducibly transferring methodologies between research groups and for scaling between computational infrastructures. Research groups currently invest a lot of time and effort in creating and updating workflows; the ability to translate from one workflow language into another can make them easier to share, and maintain with minimal effort. For example, research groups that would like to run an existing Galaxy workflow on HPC, or extend it for their use, might find translating the workflow to Nextflow more suitable for their ongoing use-cases.  Janis is a framework that provides an abstraction layer for describing workflows, and a tool that can translate workflows between existing languages such as CWL, WDL, Galaxy and Nextflow. Janis aims to translate as much as it can, leaving the user to validate the workflow and make small manual adjustments where direct translations are not possible. Originating from the Portable Pipelines Project between Melbourne Bioinformatics, the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, this tool is now available for everyone to use. This workshop provides an introduction to Janis and how it can be used to translate Galaxy and CWL based tools and workflows into Nextflow. Using hands-on examples we’ll step you through the process and demonstrate how to optimise, troubleshoot and test the translated workflows. This workshop event and accompanying materials were developed by the Melbourne Bioinformatics and the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre. The workshop was enabled through the Australian BioCommons - Bring Your Own Data Platforms project funded by the Australian Research Data Commons and NCRIS via Bioplatforms Australia.    Materials Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Intro to Galaxy (PDF): Slides presented during the workshop Intro to CWL (PDF): Slides presented during the workshop Intro to the session & Janis (PDF): Slides presented during the workshop Janis_Schedule (PDF): Schedule for the workshop providing a breakdown of topics and timings Materials shared elsewhere: This workshop follows the accompanying training materials: https://www.melbournebioinformatics.org.au/tutorials/tutorials/janis_translate/janis_translate   A recording of the workshop is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube channel: https://youtu.be/0IiY1GEx_BY Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, CWL, Galaxy
WEBINAR:Genomic data - improving discovery and access management

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Genomic data - improving discovery and access management’. This webinar took place on 14 June 2023.

Event description 

Australian human genome initiatives are generating vast amounts of human genome data...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Data security, Genomics, Data access management

WEBINAR:Genomic data - improving discovery and access management https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-genomic-data-improving-discovery-and-access-management This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Genomic data - improving discovery and access management’. This webinar took place on 14 June 2023. Event description  Australian human genome initiatives are generating vast amounts of human genome data to understand the cause of complex diseases, improve diagnosis / early disease detection and identify tailored treatment options.  To achieve this, genomic data needs to be compared between multiple individuals and cohorts, often across efforts/jurisdictions, at national or global scales, and requires the genomic data to be findable, searchable, shareable, and linkable to analytical capabilities. The Human Genome Platform Project aims to make it as easy as possible to securely and responsibly share human genome research data nationally and internationally. The project is building a ‘services toolbox’ that combines best practice technologies in human genome data sharing. In this webinar the project team will discuss three important aspects of human genomic data sharing i) discovery of genomic cohorts and the GA4GH Beacon protocol that enables this functionality across multiple sites ii) streamlining of data access request management; the Garvan will share experience using the Resource Entitlement Management System (REMS) software package. iii) community management functionality of CILogon and Materials Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Genomic data - improving discovery and access managements - slides.pdf: A PDF copy of the slides presented during the webinar. Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/9SD6gpjDGWE Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Data security, Genomics, Data access management
WEBINAR: Getting started with proteomics

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Getting started with proteomics’. This webinar took place on 7 June 2023.

Event description 

Proteomics aims to identify and quantify all the proteins and peptides within a sample. Mass-spectrometry is...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Proteomics, Mass spectrometry

WEBINAR: Getting started with proteomics https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-getting-started-with-proteomics This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Getting started with proteomics’. This webinar took place on 7 June 2023. Event description  Proteomics aims to identify and quantify all the proteins and peptides within a sample. Mass-spectrometry is the most common tool for proteomics and the wide array of methods, techniques and specialised approaches available have made it a popular method for probing cells, tissue and organisms in response to various stimuli or diseases. Each proteomics method has unique experimental design considerations and optimum workflows for data analysis meaning that there is no one-size-fits all solution. The variety of approaches available provides flexibility but can be bewildering and a barrier to getting started.  This webinar sets you up with the foundational knowledge of what to look out for when designing and understanding proteomics experiments. It outlines what you can and can’t do with proteomics, the type of data to expect as well as common data analysis approaches and quality control steps. This webinar was developed in collaboration with the Australian Core Facilities and Australian Proteomics Communities. Materials Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Getting started with proteomics_slides: A PDF copy of the slides presented during the webinar. Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/RSrk2yqklQo Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Proteomics, Mass spectrometry
WORKSHOP: Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research’. This workshop took place over two, 3 hour sessions on 18-19 May 2023.

Event description

Processing and analysing omics datasets poses many...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-core

WORKSHOP: Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-unlocking-nf-core-customising-workflows-for-your-research This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research’. This workshop took place over two, 3 hour sessions on 18-19 May 2023. Event description Processing and analysing omics datasets poses many challenges to life scientists, particularly when we need to share our methods with other researchers and scale up our research. Public and reproducible bioinformatics workflows, like those developed by nf-core, are invaluable resources for the life science community. nf-core is a community-driven effort to provide high-quality bioinformatics workflows for common analyses including, RNAseq, mapping, variant calling, and single cell transcriptomics. A big advantage of using nf-core workflows is the ability to customise and optimise them for different computational environments, types and sizes of data and research goals.  This workshop will set you up with the foundational knowledge required to run and customise nf-core workflows in a reproducible manner. On day 1 you will learn about the nf-core tools utility, and step through the code structure of nf-core workflows. Then on day 2, using the nf-core/rnaseq workflow as an example, you will explore the various ways to adjust the workflow parameters, customise processes, and configure the workflow for your computational environment. This workshop event and accompanying materials were developed by the Sydney Informatics Hub, University of Sydney in partnership with Seqera Labs, Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre, and Australia’s National Research Education Network (AARNet). The workshop was enabled through the Australian BioCommons - Bring Your Own Data Platforms project (Australian Research Data Commons and NCRIS via Bioplatforms Australia).  Materials Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. nfcore_Schedule: Schedule for the workshop providing a breakdown of topics and timings nfcore_Q_and_A: Archive of questions and their answers from the workshop Slack Channel. Materials shared elsewhere: This workshop follows the accompanying training materials that were developed by the Sydney Informatics Hub, University of Sydney in partnership with Seqera Labs, Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre, and Australia’s National Research Education Network (AARNet).  https://sydney-informatics-hub.github.io/customising-nfcore-workshop Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-core
AMD Profiling

The AMD profiling workshop covers the AMD suite of tools for development of HPC applications on AMD GPUs.

You will learn how to use the rocprof profiler and trace visualization tool that has long been available as part of the ROCm software suite.

You will also learn how to use the new...

Keywords: supercomputing, performance, GPUs, CPUs, AMD, HPC, ROCm

Resource type: activity

AMD Profiling https://dresa.org.au/materials/amd-profiling The AMD profiling workshop covers the AMD suite of tools for development of HPC applications on AMD GPUs. You will learn how to use the rocprof profiler and trace visualization tool that has long been available as part of the ROCm software suite. You will also learn how to use the new Omnitools - Omnitrace and Omniperf - that were introduced at the end of 2022. Omnitrace is a powerful tracing profiler for both CPU and GPU. It can collect data from a much wider range of sources and includes hardware counters and sampling approaches. Omniperf is a performance analysis tool that can help you pinpoint how your application is performing with a visual view of the memory hierarchy on the GPU as well as reporting the percentage of peak for many different measurements. training@pawsey.org.au supercomputing, performance, GPUs, CPUs, AMD, HPC, ROCm
Evaluate Application Performance using TAU and E4S

In this workshop, you learn about the Extreme-scale Scientific Software Stack and the TAU Performance System® and its interfaces to other tools and libraries. The workshop includes sample codes that illustrate the different instrumentation and measurement choices.

Topics covered include...

Keywords: supercomputing, TAU, E4S, Performance, ROCm, OpenMP

Resource type: activity

Evaluate Application Performance using TAU and E4S https://dresa.org.au/materials/evaluate-application-performance-using-tau-and-e4s In this workshop, you learn about the Extreme-scale Scientific Software Stack and the TAU Performance System® and its interfaces to other tools and libraries. The workshop includes sample codes that illustrate the different instrumentation and measurement choices. Topics covered include generating performance profiles and traces with memory utilization and headroom, I/O, and interfaces to ROCm, including ROCProfiler and ROCTracer with support for collecting hardware performance data. The workshop also covers instrumentation of OpenMP programs using OpenMP Tools Interface (OMPT), including support for target offload and measurement of a program’s memory footprint. During the session, there are hands-on activities on scalable tracing using OTF2 and visualization using the Vampir trace analysis tool. Performance data analysis using ParaProf and PerfExplorer are demonstrated using the performance data management framework (TAUdb) that includes TAU’s performance database. training@pawsey.org.au supercomputing, TAU, E4S, Performance, ROCm, OpenMP
HIP Workshop

The Heterogeneous Interface for Portability (HIP) provides a programming framework for harnessing the compute capabilities of multicore processors, such as the MI250X GPU’s on Setonix.

In this course we focus on the essentials of developing HIP applications with a focus on...

Keywords: HIP, supercomputing, Programming, GPUs, MPI, debugging

Resource type: full-course

HIP Workshop https://dresa.org.au/materials/hip-workshop The Heterogeneous Interface for Portability (HIP) provides a programming framework for harnessing the compute capabilities of multicore processors, such as the MI250X GPU’s on Setonix. In this course we focus on the essentials of developing HIP applications with a focus on supercomputing. Agenda - Introduction to HIP and high level features - How to build and run applications on Setonix with HIP and MPI - A complete line-by-line walkthrough of a HIP-enabled application - Tools and techniques for debugging and measuring the performance of HIP applications training@pawsey.org.au HIP, supercomputing, Programming, GPUs, MPI, debugging
C/C++ Refresher

The C++ programming language and its C subset is used extensively in research environments. In particular it is the language utilised in the parallel programming frameworks CUDA, HIP, and OpenCL.

This workshop is designed to equip participants with “Survival C++”, an understanding of the basic...

Keywords: supercomputing, C/C++, Programming

Resource type: activity

C/C++ Refresher https://dresa.org.au/materials/c-c-refresher The C++ programming language and its C subset is used extensively in research environments. In particular it is the language utilised in the parallel programming frameworks CUDA, HIP, and OpenCL. This workshop is designed to equip participants with “Survival C++”, an understanding of the basic syntax, how information is encoded in binary format, and how to compile and debug C++ software. training@pawsey.org.au supercomputing, C/C++, Programming
A hands on introduction to Large Language Models like Bing Chat and ChatGPT

Event run 7 June at the MQ Incubator. Event description:

A two-hour hands-on workshop giving a brief history of the last 4 months of development of "Generative AI."

These tools, these Large Language Models, offer present promise and peril -- disruption -- to ways of working and of...

Keywords: Large Language Model, ChatGPT

A hands on introduction to Large Language Models like Bing Chat and ChatGPT https://dresa.org.au/materials/a-hands-on-introduction-to-large-language-models-like-bing-chat-and-chatgpt Event run 7 June at the MQ Incubator. Event description: A two-hour hands-on workshop giving a brief history of the last 4 months of development of "Generative AI." These tools, these Large Language Models, offer present promise and peril -- disruption -- to ways of working and of learning. Outside the "hype," these tools are "calculators for words" and allow the same manipulation and reflection of a user's words as a calculator offers for a user's numbers. The workshop will guide users into using various free and paid tools, and the effective use of Large Language Models through chain of thought prompting. Remember: a LLM is "Always confident and usually correct." OSF Description (LLM generated): This two-hour workshop provides a comprehensive introduction to the world of Large Language Models (LLMs), focusing on the recent advancements in Generative AI. Participants will gain insights into the development and functionality of prominent LLMs such as Bing Chat and ChatGPT. The workshop will delve into the concept of LLMs as "calculators for words," highlighting their potential to revolutionize ways of working and learning. The session will explore the principles of Prompt Engineering and Transactional Prompting, demonstrating how consistent prompts can yield reliable and reproducible results. Participants will also learn about the practical applications of LLMs, including editing and proofreading papers, generating technical documentation, recipe ideation, and more. The workshop emphasizes the importance of understanding the terms of use and the responsibilities that come with using these powerful AI tools. By the end of the session, participants will be equipped with the knowledge and skills to effectively use LLMs in various contexts, guided by the mantra that a LLM is "Always confident and usually correct." Brian Ballsun-Stanton (brian.ballsun-stanton@mq.edu.au) Large Language Model, ChatGPT researcher
WEBINAR: Pro tips for scaling bioinformatics workflows to HPC

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Pro tips for scaling bioinformatics workflows to HPC’. This webinar took place on 31 May 2023.

Event description 

High Performance Computing (HPC) infrastructures offer the computational scale and...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, HPC, High Performance Computing

WEBINAR: Pro tips for scaling bioinformatics workflows to HPC https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-pro-tips-for-scaling-bioinformatics-workflows-to-hpc This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Pro tips for scaling bioinformatics workflows to HPC’. This webinar took place on 31 May 2023. Event description  High Performance Computing (HPC) infrastructures offer the computational scale and efficiency that life scientists need to handle complex biological datasets and multi-step computational workflows. But scaling workflows to HPC from smaller, more familiar computational infrastructures brings with it new jargon, expectations, and processes to learn. To make the most of HPC resources, bioinformatics workflows need to be designed for distributed computing environments and carefully manage varying resource requirements, and data scale related to biology.   In this webinar, Dr Georgina Samaha from the Sydney Informatics Hub, Dr Matthew Downton from the National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) and Dr Sarah Beecroft from the Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre help you navigate the world of HPC for running and developing bioinformatics workflows. They explain when you should take your workflows to HPC and highlight the architectural features you should make the most of to scale your analyses once you’re there. You’ll hear pro-tips for dealing with common pain points like software installation, optimising for parallel computing and resource management, and will find out how to get access to Australia’s National HPC infrastructures at NCI and Pawsey.  Materials Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Pro-tips_HPC_Slides: A PDF copy of the slides presented during the webinar. Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/YKJDRXCmGMo Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, HPC, High Performance Computing