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WORKSHOP: Working with genomics sequences and features in R with Bioconductor

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Working with genomics sequences and features in R with Bioconductor’. This workshop took place on 23 September 2021.

Workshop description

Explore the many useful functions that the Bioconductor...

Keywords: R software, Bioconductor, Bioinformatics, Analysis, Genomics, Sequence analysis

WORKSHOP: Working with genomics sequences and features in R with Bioconductor https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-working-with-genomics-sequences-and-features-in-r-with-bioconductor This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Working with genomics sequences and features in R with Bioconductor’. This workshop took place on 23 September 2021. **Workshop description** Explore the many useful functions that the Bioconductor environment offers for working with genomic data and other biological sequences.  DNA and proteins are often represented as files containing strings of nucleic acids or amino acids. They are associated with text files that provide additional contextual information such as genome annotations. This workshop provides hands-on experience with tools, software and packages available in R via Bioconductor for manipulating, exploring and extracting information from biological sequences and annotation files. We will look at tools for working with some commonly used file formats including FASTA, GFF3, GTF, methods for identifying regions of interest, and easy methods for obtaining data packages such as genome assemblies.  This workshop is presented by the Australian BioCommons and Monash Bioinformatics Platform with the assistance of a network of facilitators from the national Bioinformatics Training Cooperative. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - Schedule (PDF): schedule for the workshop providing a breakdown of topics and timings **Materials shared elsewhere:** This workshop follows the tutorial ‘Working with DNA sequences and features in R with Bioconductor - version 2’ developed for Monash Bioinformatics Platform and Monash Data Fluency by Paul Harrison. https://monashdatafluency.github.io/r-bioc-2/ Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) R software, Bioconductor, Bioinformatics, Analysis, Genomics, Sequence analysis
WORKSHOP: Online data analysis for biologists

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Online data analysis for biologists’. This workshop took place on 9 September 2021.

Workshop description

Galaxy is an online platform for biological research that allows people to use...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Analysis, Workflows, Galaxy Australia

WORKSHOP: Online data analysis for biologists https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-online-data-analysis-for-biologists This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Online data analysis for biologists’. This workshop took place on 9 September 2021. **Workshop description** Galaxy is an online platform for biological research that allows people to use computational data analysis tools and workflows without the need for programming experience. It is an open source, web-based platform for accessible, reproducible, and transparent computational biomedical research. It also captures run information so that workflows can be saved, repeated and shared efficiently via the web. This interactive beginners workshop will provide an introduction to the Galaxy interface, histories and available tools. The material covered in this workshop is freely available through the Galaxy Training Network. The workshop will be held via Zoom and involves a combination of presentations by the lead trainer and smaller breakout groups supported by experienced facilitators. The materials are shared under a Creative Commons 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - Schedule (PDF): schedule for the workshop - Online_data_analysis_for_biologists_extraslides (PPTX and PDF): Slides used to introduce the data set and emphasise the importance of workflows. These slides were developed by Ms Grace Hall. **Materials shared elsewhere:** The tutorial used in this workshop is available via the Galaxy Training Network. Anne Fouilloux, Nadia Goué, Christopher Barnett, Michele Maroni, Olha Nahorna, Dave Clements, Saskia Hiltemann, 2021 Galaxy 101 for everyone (Galaxy Training Materials). https://training.galaxyproject.org/training-material/topics/introduction/tutorials/galaxy-intro-101-everyone/tutorial.html Online; accessed Fri Dec 10 2021 Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Analysis, Workflows, Galaxy Australia
WEBINAR: Launching the new Apollo Service: collaborative genome annotation for Australian researchers

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Launching the new Apollo Service: collaborative genome annotation for Australian researchers’. This webinar/workshop took place on 29 September 2021.

Event description

Genome annotation is crucial...

Keywords: Genome Annotation, Genomics, Genome curation, Bioinformatics, Apollo software

WEBINAR: Launching the new Apollo Service: collaborative genome annotation for Australian researchers https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-launching-the-new-apollo-service-collaborative-genome-annotation-for-australian-researchers This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Launching the new Apollo Service: collaborative genome annotation for Australian researchers’. This webinar/workshop took place on 29 September 2021. **Event description** Genome annotation is crucial to defining the function of genomic sequences. Apollo is a popular tool for facilitating real-time collaborative curation and genome annotation editing. The technical obstacles faced by Australian researchers wanting to access and maintain this software have now been solved.  The new Australian Apollo Service can host your genome assembly and supporting evidence files, taking care of all the system administration so you and your team can focus on the annotation curation itself. The Australian BioCommons and partners at QCIF and Pawsey are now offering the Apollo Service free to use for Australian-based research groups and research consortia. As part of this launch, you’ll hear what’s possible from some of the early adopters who helped guide the development of the service. These Australian researchers will highlight the benefits that Apollo is bringing to their genome annotation and curation workflows. Join us to find out how you can get access to the Australian Apollo Service. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - Degnan Lab - Apollo Launch Webinar (PDF): Slides presented by Professors Sandie and Bernie Degnan - Nelson - Apollo Launch Webinar (PDF): Slides presented by Dr Tiffanie Nelson - Voelker - Apollo Launch Webinar (PDF): Slides presented by Julia Voelker - Rane - Apollo Launch Webinar (PDF): Slides presented by Dr Rahul Rane. **Materials shared elsewhere:** A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/o8jhRra-x4Y   Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Genome Annotation, Genomics, Genome curation, Bioinformatics, Apollo software
WEBINAR: KBase - A knowledge base for systems biology

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘KBase - A knowledge base for systems biology’. This webinar took place on 22 September 2021.

Event description

Developed for bench biologists and bioinformaticians, The Department of Energy...

Keywords: Systems Biology, FAIR Research, Open Source Software, Metagenomics, Microbiology

WEBINAR: KBase - A knowledge base for systems biology https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-kbase-a-knowledge-base-for-systems-biology This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘KBase - A knowledge base for systems biology’. This webinar took place on 22 September 2021. **Event description** Developed for bench biologists and bioinformaticians, The Department of Energy Systems Biology Knowledgebase (KBase) is a free, open source, software and data science platform designed to meet the grand challenge of systems biology: predicting and designing biological function. This webinar will provide an overview of the KBase mission and user community, as well as a tour of the online platform and basic functionality. You’ll learn how KBase can support your research: Upload data, run analysis tools (Apps), share your analysis with collaborators, and publish your data and reproducible workflows. We’ll highlight a brand new feature that enables users to link environment and measurement data to sequencing data. You’ll also find out how KBase supports findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable (FAIR) research by providing open, reproducible, shareable bioinformatics workflows. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - Q&A for Australian BioCommons KBase Webinar [PDF]: Document containing answers to questions asked during the webinar and links to additional resources - Introduction to KBase: Australian BioCommons Webinar [PDF]: Slides presented during the webinar **Materials shared elsewhere:** A recording of the webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/tJ94i9gOJfU The slides are also available as Google slides:  https://tinyurl.com/KBase-webinar-slides Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Systems Biology, FAIR Research, Open Source Software, Metagenomics, Microbiology
WEBINAR: Where to go when your bioinformatics outgrows your compute

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Where to go when your bioinformatics outgrows your compute’. This webinar took place on 19 August 2021.

Bioinformatics analyses are often complex, requiring multiple software tools and specialised...

Keywords: Computational Biology, Bioinformatics, High performance computing, HPC, Galaxy Australia, Nectar Research Cloud, Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, NCI, NCMAS, Cloud computing

WEBINAR: Where to go when your bioinformatics outgrows your compute https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-where-to-go-when-your-bioinformatics-outgrows-your-compute This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Where to go when your bioinformatics outgrows your compute’. This webinar took place on 19 August 2021. Bioinformatics analyses are often complex, requiring multiple software tools and specialised compute resources. “I don’t know what compute resources I will need”, “My analysis won’t run and I don’t know why” and "Just getting it to work" are common pain points for researchers. In this webinar, you will learn how to understand the compute requirements for your bioinformatics workflows. You will also hear about ways of accessing compute that suits your needs as an Australian researcher, including Galaxy Australia, cloud and high-performance computing services offered by the Australian Research Data Commons, the National Compute Infrastructure (NCI) and Pawsey.  We also describe bioinformatics and computing support services available to Australian researchers.  This webinar was jointly organised with the Sydney Informatics Hub at the University of Sydney. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - Where to go when your bioinformatics outgrows your compute - slides (PDF and PPTX): Slides presented during the webinar - Australian research computing resources cheat sheet (PDF): A list of resources and useful links mentioned during the webinar. **Materials shared elsewhere:** A recording of the webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/hNTbngSc-W0 Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Computational Biology, Bioinformatics, High performance computing, HPC, Galaxy Australia, Nectar Research Cloud, Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, NCI, NCMAS, Cloud computing
WEBINAR: High performance bioinformatics: submitting your best NCMAS application

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘High performance bioinformatics: submitting your best NCMAS application’. This webinar took place on 20 August 2021.

Bioinformaticians are increasingly turning to specialised compute infrastructure and...

Keywords: Computational Biology, Bioinformatics, High Performance Computing, HPC, NCMAS

WEBINAR: High performance bioinformatics: submitting your best NCMAS application https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-high-performance-bioinformatics-submitting-your-best-ncmas-application This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘High performance bioinformatics: submitting your best NCMAS application’. This webinar took place on 20 August 2021. Bioinformaticians are increasingly turning to specialised compute infrastructure and efficient, scalable workflows as their research becomes more data intensive. Australian researchers that require extensive compute resources to process large datasets can apply for access to national high performance computing facilities (e.g. Pawsey and NCI) to power their research through the National Computational Merit Allocation Scheme (NCMAS). NCMAS is a competitive, merit-based scheme and requires applicants to carefully consider how the compute infrastructure and workflows will be applied.  This webinar provides life science researchers with insights into what makes a strong NCMAS application, with a focus on the technical assessment, and how to design and present effective and efficient bioinformatic workflows for the various national compute facilities. It will be followed by a short Q&A session. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - High performance bioinformatics: submitting your best NCMAS application - slides (PDF and PPTX): Slides presented during the webinar **Materials shared elsewhere:** A recording of the webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/HeFGjguwS0Y Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Computational Biology, Bioinformatics, High Performance Computing, HPC, NCMAS
WEBINAR: Getting started with R

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Getting started with R’. This webinar took place on 16 August 2021.

Data analysis skills are now central to most biological experiments. While Excel can cover some of your data analysis needs, it is not...

Keywords: R statistical software, R studio, Tidyverse, Bioinformatics, Data analysis

WEBINAR: Getting started with R https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-getting-started-with-r This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Getting started with R’. This webinar took place on 16 August 2021. Data analysis skills are now central to most biological experiments. While Excel can cover some of your data analysis needs, it is not always the best choice, particularly for large and complex datasets. R is an open-source software and programming language that enables data exploration, statistical analysis visualisation and more. While it is the tool of choice for data analysis, getting started can be a little daunting for those without a background in statistics. In this webinar Saskia Freytag, an R user with over a decade of experience and member of the Bioconductor Community Advisory Board, will walk you through their hints and tips for getting started with R and data analysis. She’ll cover topics like R Studio and why you need it, where to get help, basic data manipulation, visualisations and extending R with libraries. The webinar will be followed by a short Q&A session Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - Getting started with R - slides (PDF): Slides used in the presentation **Materials shared elsewhere:** A recording of the webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/JS7yZw7bnX8 Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) R statistical software, R studio, Tidyverse, Bioinformatics, Data analysis
WEBINAR: Making sense of phosphoproteomics data with Phosphomatics

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar  ‘Making sense of phosphoproteomics data with Phosphomatics’. This webinar took place on 2 June 2021.

Mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics is one of the most powerful tools available for...

Keywords: Phosphoproteomics, Proteomics, Mass spectrometry

WEBINAR: Making sense of phosphoproteomics data with Phosphomatics https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-making-sense-of-phosphoproteomics-data-with-phosphomatics This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar  ‘Making sense of phosphoproteomics data with Phosphomatics’. This webinar took place on 2 June 2021. Mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics is one of the most powerful tools available for investigating the detailed molecular events that occur in response to cellular stimuli. Experiments can routinely detect and quantify thousands of phosphorylated peptides, and interpreting this data, and extracting biological meaning, remains challenging.  This webinar provides an overview of the phosphoproteomics data analysis website, Phosphomatics, that incorporates a suite of tools and resources for statistical and functional analysis that aim to simplify the process of extracting meaningful insights from experimental results. Phosphomatics can natively import search and quantitation results from major search engines including MaxQuant and Proteome Discoverer and employs intuitive ‘wizards’ to guide users through data preprocessing routines such as filtering, normalization and transformation. A graphical platform of interactive univariate and multivariate analysis features is provided that allow subgroups of the uploaded data containing phosphosites of statistical interest to be created and interrogated through further functional analysis. A range of databases have been integrated that, for example, provide ligand and inhibitor information for key proteins or highlight key modification sites known to be involved in functional state regulation. At each step, published literature is natively incorporated along with a ‘bibliography builder’ that allows references of interest to be assembled and exported in various formats. Taken together, these expanded features aim to provide a ‘one-stop-shop’ for phosphoproteomics data analysis. The webinar is followed by a short Q&A session. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event.   **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - Phosphomatics -slides  (PDF and PPTX): Slides used in the presentation **Materials shared elsewhere:** A recording of the webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/_WpeL5t2DSI Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Phosphoproteomics, Proteomics, Mass spectrometry
WEBINAR: Getting started with deep learning

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar  ‘Getting started with deep learning’. This webinar took place on 21 July 2021.

Are you wondering what deep learning is and how it might be useful in your research? This high level overview introduces...

Keywords: Deep learning, Neural networks, Machine learning

WEBINAR: Getting started with deep learning https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-getting-started-with-deep-learning-d7b1fac1-ebae-426d-8bc0-d82cfda8e8ad This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar  ‘Getting started with deep learning’. This webinar took place on 21 July 2021. Are you wondering what deep learning is and how it might be useful in your research? This high level overview introduces deep learning ‘in a nutshell’ and provides tips on which concepts and skills you will need to know to build a deep learning application. The presentation also provides pointers to various resources you can use to get started in deep learning. The webinar is followed by a short Q&A session. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - Getting Started with Deep Learning - Slides (PDF): Slides used in the presentation **Materials shared elsewhere:** A recording of the webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/I1TmpnZUuiQ Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Deep learning, Neural networks, Machine learning
WEBINAR: Detection of and phasing of hybrid accessions in a target capture dataset

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Detection of and phasing of hybrid accessions in a target capture dataset’. This webinar took place on 10 June 2021.

Hybridisation plays an important role in evolution, leading to the exchange of genes...

Keywords: Phylogenetics, Bioinformatics, Phylogeny, Genomics, Target capture sequencing

WEBINAR: Detection of and phasing of hybrid accessions in a target capture dataset https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-detection-of-and-phasing-of-hybrid-accessions-in-a-target-capture-dataset This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Detection of and phasing of hybrid accessions in a target capture dataset’. This webinar took place on 10 June 2021. Hybridisation plays an important role in evolution, leading to the exchange of genes between species and, in some cases, generate new lineages. The use of molecular methods has revealed the frequency and importance of reticulation events is higher than previously thought and this insight continues with the ongoing development of phylogenomic methods that allow novel insights into the role and extent of hybridisation. Hybrids notoriously provide challenges for the reconstruction of evolutionary relationships, as they contain conflicting genetic information from their divergent parental lineages. However, this also provides the opportunity to gain insights into the origin of hybrids (including autopolyploids). This webinar explores some of the challenges and opportunities that occur when hybrids are included in a target capture sequence dataset. In particular, it describes the impact of hybrid accessions on sequence assembly and phylogenetic analysis and further explores how the information of the conflicting phylogenetic signal can be used to detect and resolve hybrid accessions. The webinar showcases a novel bioinformatic workflow, HybPhaser, that can be used to detect and phase hybrids in target capture datasets and will provide the theoretical background and concepts behind the workflow. This webinar is part of a series of webinars and workshops developed by the Genomics for Australian Plants (GAP) Initiative that focuses on the analysis of target capture sequence data. In addition to two public webinars, the GAP bioinformatics working group is offering training workshops in the use of newly developed and existing scripts in an integrated workflow to participants in the 2021 virtual Australasian Systematic Botany Society Conference. The materials are shared under a Creative Commons 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - Nauheimer_hybphaser_slides (PDF): Slides presented during the webinar **Materials shared elsewhere:** A recording of the webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/japXwTAhA5U Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Phylogenetics, Bioinformatics, Phylogeny, Genomics, Target capture sequencing
WEBINAR: Conflict in multi-gene datasets: why it happens and what to do about it - deep coalescence, paralogy and reticulation

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Conflict in multi-gene datasets: why it happens and what to do about it - deep coalescence, paralogy and reticulation’. This webinar took place on 20 May 2021.

Multi-gene datasets used in phylogenetic...

Keywords: Phylogenetics, Bioinformatics, Phylogeny, Genomics, Target capture sequencing

WEBINAR: Conflict in multi-gene datasets: why it happens and what to do about it - deep coalescence, paralogy and reticulation https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-conflict-in-multi-gene-datasets-why-it-happens-and-what-to-do-about-it-deep-coalescence-paralogy-and-reticulation This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Conflict in multi-gene datasets: why it happens and what to do about it - deep coalescence, paralogy and reticulation’. This webinar took place on 20 May 2021. Multi-gene datasets used in phylogenetic analyses, such as those produced by the sequence capture or target enrichment used in the Genomics for Australian Plants: Australian Angiosperm Tree of Life project, often show discordance between individual gene trees and between gene and species trees. This webinar explores three different forms of discordance: deep coalescence, paralogy, and reticulation. In each case, it considers underlying biological processes, how discordance presents in the data, and what bioinformatic or phylogenetic approaches and tools are available to address these challenges. It covers Yang and Smith paralogy resolution and general information on options for phylogenetic analysis. This webinar is part of a series of webinars and workshops developed by the Genomics for Australian Plants (GAP) Initiative that focused on the analysis of target capture sequence data. In addition to two public webinars, the GAP bioinformatics working group is offering training workshops in the use of newly developed and existing scripts in an integrated workflow to participants in the 2021 virtual Australasian Systematic Botany Society Conference. The materials are shared under a Creative Commons 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - Schmidt-Lebuhn - paralogy lineage sorting reticulation - slides (PDF): Slides presented during the webinar **Materials shared elsewhere:** A recording of the webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/1bw81q898z8 Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Phylogenetics, Bioinformatics, Phylogeny, Genomics, Target capture sequencing
WORKSHOP: Variant calling in humans, animals and plants with Galaxy

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Variant calling in humans, animals and plants with Galaxy’. This workshop took place on 25 May 2021.

Variant calling in polyploid organisms, including humans, plants and animals, can help determine...

Keywords: Variant calling, Genetic Variation Analysis, SNP annotation

WORKSHOP: Variant calling in humans, animals and plants with Galaxy https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-variant-calling-in-humans-animals-and-plants-with-galaxy This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Variant calling in humans, animals and plants with Galaxy’. This workshop took place on 25 May 2021. Variant calling in polyploid organisms, including humans, plants and animals, can help determine single or multi-variant contributors to a phenotype. Further, sexual reproduction (as compared to asexual) combines variants in a novel manner; this can be used to determine previously unknown variant - phenotype combinations but also to track lineage and lineage associated traits (GWAS studies), that all rely on highly accurate variant calling. The ability to confidently call variants in polyploid organisms is highly dependent on the balance between the frequency of variant observations against the background of non-variant observations, and even further compounded when one considers multi-variant positions within the genome. These are some of the challenges that will be explored in the workshop. In this online workshop we focused on the tools and workflows available for variant calling in polyploid organisms in Galaxy Australia. The workshop provided opportunities for hands-on experience using Freebayes for variant calling and SnpEff and GEMINI for variant annotation. The workshop made use of data from a case study on diagnosing a genetic disease however the tools and workflows are equally applicable to other polyploid organisms and biological questions. Access to all of the tools covered in this workshop was via Galaxy Australia, an online platform for biological research that allows people to use computational data analysis tools and workflows without the need for programming experience. The materials are shared under a Creative Commons 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event.   **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - Schedule (PDF): schedule for the workshop - Variant calling - humans, animals, plants - slides (PPTX and PDF): slides used in the workshop **Materials shared elsewhere:** The tutorial used in this workshop is available via the Galaxy Training Network. Wolfgang Maier, Bérénice Batut, Torsten Houwaart, Anika Erxleben, Björn Grüning, 2021 Exome sequencing data analysis for diagnosing a genetic disease (Galaxy Training Materials). https://training.galaxyproject.org/training-material/topics/variant-analysis/tutorials/exome-seq/tutorial.html Online; accessed 25 May 2021 Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Variant calling, Genetic Variation Analysis, SNP annotation
WEBINAR: Getting started with command line bioinformatics

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Getting started with command line bioinformatics’. This webinar took place on 22 June 2021. 

Bioinformatics skills are in demand like never before and biologists are stepping up to the challenge of...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Command line, Workflows, Bash, Computational biology

WEBINAR: Getting started with command line bioinformatics https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-getting-started-with-command-line-bioinformatics-a1426275-7f44-457e-94a3-298d9121fb20 This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Getting started with command line bioinformatics’. This webinar took place on 22 June 2021.  Bioinformatics skills are in demand like never before and biologists are stepping up to the challenge of learning to analyse large and ever growing datasets. Learning how to use the command line can open up many options for data analysis but getting started can be a little daunting for those without a background in computer science. Parice Brandies and Carolyn Hogg have recently put together ten simple rules for getting started with command-line bioinformatics to help biologists begin their computational journeys. In this webinar Parice walks you through their hints and tips for getting started with the command line. She covers topics like learning tech speak, evaluating your data and workflows, assessing computational requirements, computing options, the basics of software installation, curating and testing scripts, a bit of bash and keeping good records. The webinar will be followed by a short Q&A session. The slides were created by Parice Brandies and are based on the publication ‘Ten simple rules for getting started with command-line bioinformatics’ (https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1008645). The slides are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the webinar. **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - Getting started with command line bioinformatics - slides (PDF): Slides presented during the webinar **Materials shared elsewhere:** A recording of the webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel https://youtu.be/p7pA4OLB2X4 Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Hogg, Carolyn (type: Supervisor) Bioinformatics, Command line, Workflows, Bash, Computational biology
NCI training strategy and impact story to address pressing needs from user community

This presentation looks at how NCI provides training opportunities, supporting users to develop their digital skills with the aim of underpinning the integrity of research. NCI's new training strategy is outlined along with how training is evaluated and impact is measured. Through extensive...

Keywords: training impact, evaluation, skills training, training strategy, community, survey design, training material

NCI training strategy and impact story to address pressing needs from user community https://dresa.org.au/materials/nci-training-strategy-and-impact-story-to-address-pressing-needs-from-user-community This presentation looks at how NCI provides training opportunities, supporting users to develop their digital skills with the aim of underpinning the integrity of research. NCI's new training strategy is outlined along with how training is evaluated and impact is measured. Through extensive internal polling the training team have identified a number of gaps. Based on the gaps an end-to-end learning journey has been created. The presentation also provides an overview of immediate, middle term and community impacts of training at NCI. You can watch the video on YouTube here:https://youtu.be/LVn5TZFufjI contact@ardc.edu.au training impact, evaluation, skills training, training strategy, community, survey design, training material
Research Data Governance

This video contains key information for those who make research data-related decisions. It will help project leaders to start investigating ways to develop their own data governance policy, roles and responsibilities and procedures with the input of appropriate stakeholders.

If you want to share...

Keywords: data governance, data, research, FAIR, data management, authority, share, reuse, access, provenance, policy, responsibilities, ARDC_AU, training material

Research Data Governance https://dresa.org.au/materials/research-data-governance-cab2ebba-4e56-418d-b52f-197619e542f8 This video contains key information for those who make research data-related decisions. It will help project leaders to start investigating ways to develop their own data governance policy, roles and responsibilities and procedures with the input of appropriate stakeholders. If you want to share the video please use this: Australian Research Data Commons, 2021. Research Data Governance. [video] Available at: https://youtu.be/K_xVQRdgCIc  DOI: http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5044585 [Accessed dd Month YYYY]. contact@ardc.edu.au Martinez, Paula Andrea (type: ProjectLeader) Wilkinson, Max (type: Editor) Callaghan,Shannon (type: Editor) Savill, Jo (type: Editor) Kang, Kristan (type: Editor) Levett, Kerry (type: Editor) Russell, Keith (type: Editor) Simons, Natasha (type: Editor) data governance, data, research, FAIR, data management, authority, share, reuse, access, provenance, policy, responsibilities, ARDC_AU, training material
Skills training & materials - developing sharing guidelines and agreements

Anyone who has developed training content - specifically hands-on, short format, data science training - will know that it is expensive and time consuming. As a rule of thumb, one can expect to spend 15-20 hours of development time per hour of delivery time.

Even once the main work is done,...

Keywords: training material, training, sharing guidelines, sharing agreements

Skills training & materials - developing sharing guidelines and agreements https://dresa.org.au/materials/skills-training-materials-developing-sharing-guidelines-and-agreements Anyone who has developed training content - specifically hands-on, short format, data science training - will know that it is expensive and time consuming. As a rule of thumb, one can expect to spend 15-20 hours of development time per hour of delivery time. Even once the main work is done, there are still ongoing maintenance demands, from correcting the inevitable typos and adapting to software version updates, to major rewrites as best practice techniques evolve. Few Australians training organisations have a funding mandate for developing training material for general use. Instead most of us build training for our own communities in response to demand from those communities, allocating our limited resources to the areas of perceived highest demand. Notwithstanding this local focus, most training organisations operate in similar research environments with similar community demands, so there are real opportunities for benefit from collaboration between those organisations. In this session we will discuss how such collaboration could occur and whether a standardised national agreement around sharing of training material is an achievable outcome. This session will not discuss co-delivery opportunities, institution-specific content such as HPC training and data management, or consolidation of existing similar workshops into a single course. These are important topics, but we don’t have time to do them justice today. contact@ardc.edu.au training material, training, sharing guidelines, sharing agreements
Evaluating training at Pawsey: Motivated, confident & "changed"

This presentation outlines the digital reserach skills training evaluation methods used at Pawsey. Using the Kirpatrick Training Evaluation model in designing their training evaluation survey, Pawsey measure learning motivation (How did the participant respond to the training?), improved...

Keywords: training impact, evaluation, behavioual change, survey design, skills training, motivation, confidence, training material

Evaluating training at Pawsey: Motivated, confident & "changed" https://dresa.org.au/materials/evaluating-training-at-pawsey-motivated-confident-changed This presentation outlines the digital reserach skills training evaluation methods used at Pawsey. Using the Kirpatrick Training Evaluation model in designing their training evaluation survey, Pawsey measure learning motivation (How did the participant respond to the training?), improved confidence of the learner (Did participants understand the training?) and were there any behavioual changes (How participants applied their new knowledge in practice?). You can watch the video of the presentation on YouTube here: https://youtu.be/IOKVrBumEBQ contact@ardc.edu.au training impact, evaluation, behavioual change, survey design, skills training, motivation, confidence, training material
Intersect: Training portfolio

This presentation explores Intersect's training evaluation model. Short term evaluation for immediate satisfaction and value of the training. Long term evaluation methods with a specific survey design to determine behavioural change and impact over time of the training on researchers' workflows,...

Keywords: training impact, evaluation, short-term evaluation, long-term evaluation, behavioural change, survey design, skills training, training material

Intersect: Training portfolio https://dresa.org.au/materials/intersect-training-portfolio This presentation explores Intersect's training evaluation model. Short term evaluation for immediate satisfaction and value of the training. Long term evaluation methods with a specific survey design to determine behavioural change and impact over time of the training on researchers' workflows, use of support services post training and looking for links between digital tools/technologies training and research outputs and grants. You can watch the full video on YouTube here: https://youtu.be/J3tCC-t_eO4 contact@ardc.edu.au training impact, evaluation, short-term evaluation, long-term evaluation, behavioural change, survey design, skills training, training material
ARDC Your first step to FAIR

This workshop gives a brief overview of the FAIR principles, including a method to make a one-file dataset FAIR.

Keywords: training material, FAIR, data, workshop

ARDC Your first step to FAIR https://dresa.org.au/materials/ardc-your-first-step-to-fair This workshop gives a brief overview of the FAIR principles, including a method to make a one-file dataset FAIR. contact@ardc.edu.au Stokes, Liz (type: Editor) Martinez, Paula Andrea (type: Editor) Russell, Keith (type: Editor) training material, FAIR, data, workshop
An open source textbook for research software engineering

Over the past year, a group of Carpentries instructors have been working on an open source textbook called Research Software Engineering with Python. The book is a ready-to-go university semester course aimed at helping learners go from writing code for themselves, to creating tools that help...

Keywords: data skills, software skills, open source, research software, research software engineering, training material

An open source textbook for research software engineering https://dresa.org.au/materials/an-open-source-textbook-for-research-software-engineering Over the past year, a group of Carpentries instructors have been working on an open source textbook called Research Software Engineering with Python. The book is a ready-to-go university semester course aimed at helping learners go from writing code for themselves, to creating tools that help their entire field advance. A physical version of the book will be published with Taylor & Francis in early 2021. During the review phase of the publication process, we are seeking feedback on the content and scope of the book from the digital skills training community. contact@ardc.edu.au data skills, software skills, open source, research software, research software engineering, training material
National skills ecosystem - call to action

In this Community Action session working groups will be formed based on the challenges/opportunities that were prioritised in Community Action session #4.

  • Skilled trainers / facilitators

  • National training registry

  • National training event calendar

  • Jointly developed training

  • Research...

Keywords: national skills initiatives, data skills, training, skills community, training material

National skills ecosystem - call to action https://dresa.org.au/materials/national-skills-ecosystem-call-to-action In this Community Action session working groups will be formed based on the challenges/opportunities that were prioritised in Community Action session #4. - Skilled trainers / facilitators - National training registry - National training event calendar - Jointly developed training - Research support professionals: career/progression contact@ardc.edu.au national skills initiatives, data skills, training, skills community, training material
Sharing Approaches to Implementing the Data Guide at Medical Research Institutes (MRIs) Workshop

Co-authored by the Australian Research Council (ARC), the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) and Universities Australia (UA), the Management of Data and Information in Research Guide contains guidance for institutions and researchers on how they can implement the new Code as it...

Keywords: Data management, ARC, NHMRC, research data, Research Data Guide, Funding, training material

Sharing Approaches to Implementing the Data Guide at Medical Research Institutes (MRIs) Workshop https://dresa.org.au/materials/sharing-approaches-to-implementing-the-data-guide-at-medical-research-institutes-mris-workshop Co-authored by the Australian Research Council (ARC), the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) and Universities Australia (UA), the Management of Data and Information in Research Guide contains guidance for institutions and researchers on how they can implement the new Code as it relates to the subject of research data. This workshop included presentations and breakout discussions considering MRI approaches to data management practices in light of the Code and Guide.  This workshop was delivered as part of the Management of Data and Information in Research Guide Event.  The aims of the Event were to enable research offices within universities and Medical Research Institutes (MRIs) to have a clear and consistent understanding of the data management requirements and responsibilities as outlined in the Code and the Data Guide. contact@ardc.edu.au Data management, ARC, NHMRC, research data, Research Data Guide, Funding, training material
Developing an organisation-wide framework to transform and uplift data capabilities

At the Bureau, data is the core of everything we do. We collect millions of observations from our networks and external sources and convert these into essential weather, climate, water and ocean services. To respond effectively to the rapidly evolving data landscape, the Data 2022 and Beyond...

Keywords: data skills, research data framework, data management, data governance, data skills uplift, data capabilities, skills development, innovative technologies, stakeholder engagement, training material

Developing an organisation-wide framework to transform and uplift data capabilities https://dresa.org.au/materials/developing-an-organisation-wide-framework-to-transform-and-uplift-data-capabilities At the Bureau, data is the core of everything we do. We collect millions of observations from our networks and external sources and convert these into essential weather, climate, water and ocean services. To respond effectively to the rapidly evolving data landscape, the Data 2022 and Beyond approach has been developed to position the organisation to maximise the impact and value of data. The approach means transforming our data governance, practices and processes. It provides opportunities to leverage, enhance and grow data skills and competencies, while harnessing innovative technologies and methodologies for managing and using data. The Bureau will highlight the complexities of developing an organisation wide data management program in an operational environment and share some examples, learnings and reflections on the uplift journey so far. Key topics will include establishing the team, resources and tools to enhance data governance practices as well as engaging and collaborating with stakeholders. contact@ardc.edu.au data skills, research data framework, data management, data governance, data skills uplift, data capabilities, skills development, innovative technologies, stakeholder engagement, training material
Locking the front door without leaving the windows open: positioning authentication technologies within the "Five Safes" framework for effective use of sensitive research data

This project explores the options for access to sensitive data sets; what authentication technologies (e.g. multi-factor authentication) are needed to access sensitive data and secure compute environments.  This project seeks to position choices around authentication technologies within the Five...

Keywords: ARDC, Storage and Compute Summit, FAIR, Infrastructure, NCRIS, eResearch, training material

Locking the front door without leaving the windows open: positioning authentication technologies within the "Five Safes" framework for effective use of sensitive research data https://dresa.org.au/materials/locking-the-front-door-without-leaving-the-windows-open-positioning-authentication-technologies-within-the-five-safes-framework-for-effective-use-of-sensitive-research-data This project explores the options for access to sensitive data sets; what authentication technologies (e.g. multi-factor authentication) are needed to access sensitive data and secure compute environments.  This project seeks to position choices around authentication technologies within the Five Safes framework for research use of sensitive data, proposed in 2003 by Felix Ritchie of the UK Office of National Statistics: • Safe Projects: is the proposed research use of the data appropriate?  • Safe People: can the users be trusted to use the data in an appropriate manner?  • Safe Settings: does the access facility limit unauthorised use? • Safe Data: is there a disclosure risk in the data itself? • Safe Outputs: are the research results non-disclosive i.e. they do not compromise privacy or breach confidentiality? contact@ardc.edu.au ARDC, Storage and Compute Summit, FAIR, Infrastructure, NCRIS, eResearch, training material
Coding and Software Club at the Burnet Institute: a Sisyphean story of normalising peer-to-peer learning

This presentation outlines the Burnet Institute and its Coding and Software Club. What motivated the establishment of the Club and what keeps it going, the tools used to engage, teach and learn and finally, how the Club has impacted people at various levels of the organisation. Also explored are...

Keywords: coding, software, training impact, culture change, community, skills training, training material

Coding and Software Club at the Burnet Institute: a Sisyphean story of normalising peer-to-peer learning https://dresa.org.au/materials/coding-and-software-club-at-the-burnet-institute-a-sisyphean-story-of-normalising-peer-to-peer-learning This presentation outlines the Burnet Institute and its Coding and Software Club. What motivated the establishment of the Club and what keeps it going, the tools used to engage, teach and learn and finally, how the Club has impacted people at various levels of the organisation. Also explored are the challenges, opportunities and lessons learnt - valuable insights into what it tkaes to keep a community focused and enduring. You can watch the video on YouTube here: https://youtu.be/c2syM1Dfqbo contact@ardc.edu.au coding, software, training impact, culture change, community, skills training, training material
ARDC Skills Impact and Strategy Community Discussion

The focus of this community event arose from the ARDC SKills Summit 2021, hosted in collaboration with eResearch Australasia Conference. Two key themes identified at the Summit formed the focus of this event: 1) How to convince senior management the value of digital skills training so that they...

Keywords: training impact, evaluation, skills training, resourcing, value proposition, training material

ARDC Skills Impact and Strategy Community Discussion https://dresa.org.au/materials/ardc-skills-impact-and-strategy-community-discussion The focus of this community event arose from the ARDC SKills Summit 2021, hosted in collaboration with eResearch Australasia Conference. Two key themes identified at the Summit formed the focus of this event: 1) How to convince senior management the value of digital skills training so that they don't question resourcing 2) Evaluating the long-term impact of digital skills training on researchers’ workflows and outputs. You can watch the full video presentation on YouTube here: https://youtu.be/iSnE7OBILqs contact@ardc.edu.au training impact, evaluation, skills training, resourcing, value proposition, training material
Masterclass: Maximise your impact (padlet data)

Masterclass activity using Padlet. Questions asked: - How do you set the context for your learners? - What motivates or inspires your learners? - What are some tips to create and foster open communication channels? - How do you keep training interesting for yourself? - Post-pandemic will training...

Keywords: training impact, training tips, training techniques, motivating learners, training material

Masterclass: Maximise your impact (padlet data) https://dresa.org.au/materials/masterclass-maximise-your-impact-padlet-data Masterclass activity using Padlet. Questions asked: - How do you set the context for your learners? - What motivates or inspires your learners? - What are some tips to create and foster open communication channels? - How do you keep training interesting for yourself? - Post-pandemic will training transition to other forms (from virtual to hybrid learning)? - How do you manage diversity in subject expertise in attendees? contact@ardc.edu.au training impact, training tips, training techniques, motivating learners, training material
MetaSat. An open, collaboratively-developed metadata toolkit to support the future of space exploration.

MetaSat is an open metadata toolkit for describing small satellite (and even large satellite) missions in a uniform and shareable way. Optimised for small satellite missions, MetaSat fills an informatics gap. Although there have been a number of relevant metadata sets, there has been a...

Keywords: Small satellites, metadata, vocabularies, training material

MetaSat. An open, collaboratively-developed metadata toolkit to support the future of space exploration. https://dresa.org.au/materials/metasat-an-open-collaboratively-developed-metadata-toolkit-to-support-the-future-of-space-exploration MetaSat is an open metadata toolkit for describing small satellite (and even large satellite) missions in a uniform and shareable way. Optimised for small satellite missions, MetaSat fills an informatics gap. Although there have been a number of relevant metadata sets, there has been a longstanding need for a vocabulary to span these community standards. A vocabulary to annotate the data and information outputs of these satellite missions, to enable search across disparate data repositories, and provide support for application of analytical services to retrieved datasets. A common problem among small satellite teams is finding information about how other small satellites were put together, what parts worked well, what weren't compatible, what were the mission goals and outcomes. A lot of this information can be found, but it's not usually described in a consistent and searchable way across projects. MetaSat helps by building a uniform language of description which can be embedded into small satellite databases and tools to connect information across projects. Although a relatively new vocabulary initiative, MetaSat has secured early adoption by SatNOGS, a global network of ground stations that collects, manages & enables access to satellite observations. Also partnering with NASA's Small Satellite Reliability Initiative, and in discussion with NASA concerning implementation of the vocabulary in other areas of its information infrastructure. You can watch the full presentation on YouTube here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uaCOzNL1eh4 contact@ardc.edu.au Small satellites, metadata, vocabularies, training material
23 (research data) Things

23 (research data) things is a set of training materials exploring research data management. Each of the 23 things offers a variety of learning opportunities with activities at three levels of complexity:

  • Getting started
  • Learn more
  • Challenge me

All resources used in the program are online...

Keywords: research data management, training material

23 (research data) Things https://dresa.org.au/materials/23-research-data-things 23 (research data) things is a set of training materials exploring research data management. Each of the 23 things offers a variety of learning opportunities with activities at three levels of complexity: * Getting started * Learn more * Challenge me All resources used in the program are online and free to use and reuse under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International licence. You could use all of them as a self-paced course, or choose components to integrate into your own course. The 23 things are designed to build knowledge as the program progresses, so if you’re new to the world of research data management, we suggest you start with things 1-3 and then decide where you want to go from there. These materials supported an international community-based training program delivered in 2016 by the Australian National Data Service. This release migrates these materials to a GitHub repository for continued maintenance. Some updates were made to material that was outdated. We welcome contributions and suggestions via GitHub Issue or Pull Request. contact@ardc.edu.au research data management, training material
Why am I being asked for metadata about my research data?

Find out why metadata are important for your research data collection. This brochure shares the reasons why researchers should use metadata for their data collections.

This brochure was prepared for the ARDC Data Retention Project...

Keywords: metadata, research data, data collections, data citation, data retention project, training material

Why am I being asked for metadata about my research data? https://dresa.org.au/materials/why-am-i-being-asked-for-metadata-about-my-research-data Find out why metadata are important for your research data collection. This brochure shares the reasons why researchers should use metadata for their data collections. This brochure was prepared for the ARDC Data Retention Project https://ardc.edu.au/collaborations/strategic-activities/data-retention-project/. It is for researchers at any institution in Australia. contact@ardc.edu.au metadata, research data, data collections, data citation, data retention project, training material