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9 Reproducible Research things - Building Business Continuity

The idea that you can duplicate an experiment and get the same conclusion is the basis for all scientific discoveries. Reproducible research is data analysis that starts with the raw data and offers a transparent workflow to arrive at the same results and conclusions. However not all studies are...

Keywords: reproducibility, data management

Resource type: tutorial, video

9 Reproducible Research things - Building Business Continuity https://dresa.org.au/materials/9-reproducible-research-things-building-business-continuity The idea that you can duplicate an experiment and get the same conclusion is the basis for all scientific discoveries. Reproducible research is data analysis that starts with the raw data and offers a transparent workflow to arrive at the same results and conclusions. However not all studies are replicable due to lack of information on the process. Therefore, reproducibility in research is extremely important. Researchers genuinely want to make their research more reproducible, but sometimes don’t know where to start and often don’t have the available time to investigate or establish methods on how reproducible research can speed up every day work. We aim for the philosophy “Be better than you were yesterday”. Reproducibility is a process, and we highlight there is no expectation to go from beginner to expert in a single workshop. Instead, we offer some steps you can take towards the reproducibility path following our Steps to Reproducible Research self paced program. Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bANTr9RvnGg Tutorial: https://guereslib.github.io/Reproducible-Research-Things/ a.miotto@griffith.edu.au reproducibility, data management support masters phd researcher
Data Storytelling

Nowadays, more information created than our audience could possibly analyse on their own! A study by Stanford professor Chip Heath found that during the recall of speeches, 63% of people remember stories and how they made them feel, but only 5% remember a single statistic. So, you should convert...

Keywords: data storytelling, data visualisation

Data Storytelling https://dresa.org.au/materials/data-storytelling Nowadays, more information created than our audience could possibly analyse on their own! A study by Stanford professor Chip Heath found that during the recall of speeches, 63% of people remember stories and how they made them feel, but only 5% remember a single statistic. So, you should convert your insights and discovery from data into stories to share with non-experts with a language they understand. But how? This tutorial helps you construct stories that incite an emotional response and create meaning and understanding for the audience by applying data storytelling techniques. m.yamaguchi@griffith.edu.au a.miotto@griffith.edu.au data storytelling, data visualisation support masters phd researcher
Porting the multi-GPU SELF-Fluids code to HIPFort

In this presentation by Dr. Joseph Schoonover of Fluid Numerics LLC, Joe shares their experience with the porting process for SELF-Fluids from multi-GPU CUDA-Fortran to multi-GPU HIPFort.

The presentation covers the design principles and roadmap for SELF and the strategy to port from...

Keywords: AMD, GPUs, supercomputer, supercomputing

Resource type: presentation

Porting the multi-GPU SELF-Fluids code to HIPFort https://dresa.org.au/materials/porting-the-multi-gpu-self-fluids-code-to-hipfort In this presentation by Dr. Joseph Schoonover of Fluid Numerics LLC, Joe shares their experience with the porting process for SELF-Fluids from multi-GPU CUDA-Fortran to multi-GPU HIPFort. The presentation covers the design principles and roadmap for SELF and the strategy to port from Nvidia-only platforms to AMD & Nvidia GPUs. Also discussed are the hurdles encountered along the way and considerations for developing multi-GPU accelerated applications in Fortran. SELF is an object-oriented Fortran library that supports the implementation of Spectral Element Methods for solving partial differential equations. SELF-Fluids is an implementation of SELF that solves the compressible Navier Stokes equations on CPU only and GPU accelerated compute platforms using the Discontinuous Galerkin Spectral Element Method. The SELF API is designed based on the assumption that SEM developers and researchers need to be able to implement derivatives in 1-D and divergence, gradient, and curl in 2-D and 3-D on scalar, vector, and tensor functions using spectral collocation, continuous Galerkin, and discontinuous Galerkin spectral element methods. The presentation discussion is placed in context of the Exascale era, where we're faced with a zoo of available compute hardware. Because of this, SELF routines provide support for GPU acceleration through AMD’s HIP and support for multi-core, multi-node, and multi-GPU platforms with MPI. training@pawsey.org.au AMD, GPUs, supercomputer, supercomputing
Embracing new solutions for in-situ visualisation

This PPT was used by Jean Favre, senior visualisation software engineer at CSCS, the Swiss National Supercomputing Centre during his presentation at P'Con '21 (Pawsey's first PaCER Conference).

This material discusses the upcoming release of ParaView v5.10, a leading scientific visualisation...

Keywords: ParaView, GPUs, supercomputer, supercomputing, visualisation, data visualisation

Resource type: presentation

Embracing new solutions for in-situ visualisation https://dresa.org.au/materials/embracing-new-solutions-for-in-situ-visualisation This PPT was used by Jean Favre, senior visualisation software engineer at CSCS, the Swiss National Supercomputing Centre during his presentation at P'Con '21 (Pawsey's first PaCER Conference). This material discusses the upcoming release of ParaView v5.10, a leading scientific visualisation application. In this release ParaView consolidates its implementation of the Catalyst API, a specification developed for simulations and scientific data producers to analyse and visualise data in situ. The material reviews some of the terminology and issues of different in-situ visualisation scenarios, then reviews early Data Adaptors for tight-coupling of simulations and visualisation solutions. This is followed by an introduction of Conduit, an intuitive model for describing hierarchical scientific data. Both ParaView-Catalyst and Ascent use Conduit’s Mesh Blueprint, a set of conventions to describe computational simulation meshes. Finally, the materials present CSCS’ early experience in adopting ParaView-Catalyst and Ascent via two concrete examples of instrumentation of some proxy numerical applications. training@pawsey.org.au ParaView, GPUs, supercomputer, supercomputing, visualisation, data visualisation