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Keywords: Nextflow 


WORKSHOP: Translating workflows into Nextflow with Janis

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Translating workflows into Nextflow with Janis’. This workshop took place online on 19 June 2023.

Event description

Bioinformatics workflows are critical for reproducibly transferring methodologies...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, CWL, Galaxy

WORKSHOP: Translating workflows into Nextflow with Janis https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-translating-workflows-into-nextflow-with-janis-36386c6d-f9a2-4b4d-afa9-062ce3b8ac5d This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Translating workflows into Nextflow with Janis’. This workshop took place online on 19 June 2023. Event description Bioinformatics workflows are critical for reproducibly transferring methodologies between research groups and for scaling between computational infrastructures. Research groups currently invest a lot of time and effort in creating and updating workflows; the ability to translate from one workflow language into another can make them easier to share, and maintain with minimal effort. For example, research groups that would like to run an existing Galaxy workflow on HPC, or extend it for their use, might find translating the workflow to Nextflow more suitable for their ongoing use-cases.  Janis is a framework that provides an abstraction layer for describing workflows, and a tool that can translate workflows between existing languages such as CWL, WDL, Galaxy and Nextflow. Janis aims to translate as much as it can, leaving the user to validate the workflow and make small manual adjustments where direct translations are not possible. Originating from the Portable Pipelines Project between Melbourne Bioinformatics, the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, this tool is now available for everyone to use. This workshop provides an introduction to Janis and how it can be used to translate Galaxy and CWL based tools and workflows into Nextflow. Using hands-on examples we’ll step you through the process and demonstrate how to optimise, troubleshoot and test the translated workflows. This workshop event and accompanying materials were developed by the Melbourne Bioinformatics and the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre. The workshop was enabled through the Australian BioCommons - Bring Your Own Data Platforms project funded by the Australian Research Data Commons and NCRIS via Bioplatforms Australia.    Materials Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Intro to Galaxy (PDF): Slides presented during the workshop Intro to CWL (PDF): Slides presented during the workshop Intro to the session & Janis (PDF): Slides presented during the workshop Janis_Schedule (PDF): Schedule for the workshop providing a breakdown of topics and timings Materials shared elsewhere: This workshop follows the accompanying training materials: https://www.melbournebioinformatics.org.au/tutorials/tutorials/janis_translate/janis_translate   A recording of the workshop is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube channel: https://youtu.be/0IiY1GEx_BY Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, CWL, Galaxy
WORKSHOP: Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research’. This workshop took place over two, 3 hour sessions on 18-19 May 2023.

Event description

Processing and analysing omics datasets poses many...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-core

WORKSHOP: Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-unlocking-nf-core-customising-workflows-for-your-research-1584ff39-e007-4422-9fd5-4e407df6b6c5 This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research’. This workshop took place over two, 3 hour sessions on 18-19 May 2023. Event description Processing and analysing omics datasets poses many challenges to life scientists, particularly when we need to share our methods with other researchers and scale up our research. Public and reproducible bioinformatics workflows, like those developed by nf-core, are invaluable resources for the life science community. nf-core is a community-driven effort to provide high-quality bioinformatics workflows for common analyses including, RNAseq, mapping, variant calling, and single cell transcriptomics. A big advantage of using nf-core workflows is the ability to customise and optimise them for different computational environments, types and sizes of data and research goals.  This workshop will set you up with the foundational knowledge required to run and customise nf-core workflows in a reproducible manner. On day 1 you will learn about the nf-core tools utility, and step through the code structure of nf-core workflows. Then on day 2, using the nf-core/rnaseq workflow as an example, you will explore the various ways to adjust the workflow parameters, customise processes, and configure the workflow for your computational environment. This workshop event and accompanying materials were developed by the Sydney Informatics Hub, University of Sydney in partnership with Seqera Labs, Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre, and Australia’s National Research Education Network (AARNet). The workshop was enabled through the Australian BioCommons - Bring Your Own Data Platforms project (Australian Research Data Commons and NCRIS via Bioplatforms Australia).  Materials Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. nfcore_Schedule: Schedule for the workshop providing a breakdown of topics and timings nfcore_Q_and_A: Archive of questions and their answers from the workshop Slack Channel. Materials shared elsewhere: This workshop follows the accompanying training materials that were developed by the Sydney Informatics Hub, University of Sydney in partnership with Seqera Labs, Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre, and Australia’s National Research Education Network (AARNet).  https://sydney-informatics-hub.github.io/customising-nfcore-workshop Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-core
WORKSHOP: RNA-Seq: reads to differential genes and pathways

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘RNA-Seq: reads to differential genes and pathways’. This workshop took place over two, 3.5 hour sessions on 27 and 28 September 2022.

Event description

RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is a common method used to...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Analysis, Transcriptomics, RNA-seq, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-co.re

WORKSHOP: RNA-Seq: reads to differential genes and pathways https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-rna-seq-reads-to-differential-genes-and-pathways-5a384156-d3de-4d5d-9797-e689bf6592f8 This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘RNA-Seq: reads to differential genes and pathways’. This workshop took place over two, 3.5 hour sessions on 27 and 28 September 2022. Event description RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is a common method used to understand the differences in gene expression and molecular pathways between two or more groups. This workshop introduces the fundamental concepts of RNA sequencing experiments and will allow you to try out the analysis using data from a study of Williams-Beuren Syndrome, a rare disease.  In the first part of the workshop you will learn how to convert sequence reads into analysis ready count data. To do this we will use nf-core/rnaseq - a portable, scalable, reproducible and publicly available workflow on Pawsey Nimbus Cloud. In the second part of the workshop you will use the count data you created to identify differential genes and pathways using R/Rstudio. By the end of the workshop, you should be able to perform your own RNA-seq analysis for differential gene expression and pathway analysis! This workshop is presented by the Australian BioCommons and Sydney Informatics Hub with the assistance of a network of facilitators from the national Bioinformatics Training Cooperative. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. RNAseq reads to differential genes and pathways - Additional Resources (PDF): Additional resources compiled by the Sydney Informatics Hub rnaseq_DE_analysis_Day2.html: HTML version of code used on day 2 of the workshop rnaseq_DE_analysis_Day2.Rmd: R Markdown version of code used on day 2 of the workshop RNAseq reads to differential genes and pathways_Q_and_A (PDF): Archive of questions and their answers from the workshop Slack Channel. Materials shared elsewhere: This workshop follows the tutorial ‘RNA-seq: reads to differential gene expression workshop series’ developed by the Sydney Informatics Hub. https://sydney-informatics-hub.github.io/training.RNAseq.series-quarto/ Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Analysis, Transcriptomics, RNA-seq, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-co.re
WEBINAR: Portable, reproducible and scalable bioinformatics workflows using Nextflow and Pawsey Nimbus Cloud

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Portable, reproducible and scalable bioinformatics workflows using Nextflow and Pawsey Nimbus Cloud’. This webinar took place on 20 September 2022.

Event description 

Bioinformatics workflows can support...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, Containerisation

WEBINAR: Portable, reproducible and scalable bioinformatics workflows using Nextflow and Pawsey Nimbus Cloud https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-portable-reproducible-and-scalable-bioinformatics-workflows-using-nextflow-and-pawsey-nimbus-cloud-824bc004-4dcb-4bb5-b0dc-a207c44bbbe6 This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Portable, reproducible and scalable bioinformatics workflows using Nextflow and Pawsey Nimbus Cloud’. This webinar took place on 20 September 2022. Event description  Bioinformatics workflows can support portable, reproducible and scalable analysis of omics datasets but using workflows can be challenging for both beginners and experienced bioinformaticians. Beginners face a steep learning curve to be able to build and deploy their own bioinformatics workflows while those with more experience face challenges productionising and scaling code for custom workflows and big data.  Bioinformaticians across the world are using Nextflow to build and manage workflows. Many of these workflows are shared for others to use and supported by the community via nf-co.re. So far, 39 workflows for omics data are available with another 23 under development. These workflows cover common analyses such as RNAseq, mapping, variant calling, single cell transcriptomics and more and can be easily deployed by anyone, regardless of skill level. In this webinar, Nandan Deshpande from the Sydney Informatics Hub, University of Sydney, will discuss how you can deploy freely available Nextflow (nf.co-re) bioinformatics workflows with a single command. We describe how you can quickly get started deploying these workflows using Pawsey Nimbus Cloud. For advanced users, we introduce you to Nextflow concepts to get you started with building your own workflows that will save you time and support reproducible, portable and scalable analysis. In the latter half of the webinar, Sarah Beecroft from the Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre will talk about their Nimbus Cloud systems. While Nextflow supports portability and can run on many computing infrastructures, we describe why we specifically love using Nimbus with Nextflow for many bioinformatics projects. We will describe some of the nf.co-re workflows that we have used on Nimbus and the research outcomes. We will also cover when not to use Nimbus and the alternatives we recommend.   Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Nextflow_Nimbus_slides (PDF): A PDF copy of the slides presented during the webinar. Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/VnLX63yXbJU Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, Containerisation
WORKSHOP: Translating workflows into Nextflow with Janis

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Translating workflows into Nextflow with Janis’. This workshop took place online on 19 June 2023.

Event description

Bioinformatics workflows are critical for reproducibly transferring methodologies...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, CWL, Galaxy

WORKSHOP: Translating workflows into Nextflow with Janis https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-translating-workflows-into-nextflow-with-janis This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Translating workflows into Nextflow with Janis’. This workshop took place online on 19 June 2023. Event description Bioinformatics workflows are critical for reproducibly transferring methodologies between research groups and for scaling between computational infrastructures. Research groups currently invest a lot of time and effort in creating and updating workflows; the ability to translate from one workflow language into another can make them easier to share, and maintain with minimal effort. For example, research groups that would like to run an existing Galaxy workflow on HPC, or extend it for their use, might find translating the workflow to Nextflow more suitable for their ongoing use-cases.  Janis is a framework that provides an abstraction layer for describing workflows, and a tool that can translate workflows between existing languages such as CWL, WDL, Galaxy and Nextflow. Janis aims to translate as much as it can, leaving the user to validate the workflow and make small manual adjustments where direct translations are not possible. Originating from the Portable Pipelines Project between Melbourne Bioinformatics, the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, this tool is now available for everyone to use. This workshop provides an introduction to Janis and how it can be used to translate Galaxy and CWL based tools and workflows into Nextflow. Using hands-on examples we’ll step you through the process and demonstrate how to optimise, troubleshoot and test the translated workflows. This workshop event and accompanying materials were developed by the Melbourne Bioinformatics and the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre. The workshop was enabled through the Australian BioCommons - Bring Your Own Data Platforms project funded by the Australian Research Data Commons and NCRIS via Bioplatforms Australia.    Materials Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Intro to Galaxy (PDF): Slides presented during the workshop Intro to CWL (PDF): Slides presented during the workshop Intro to the session & Janis (PDF): Slides presented during the workshop Janis_Schedule (PDF): Schedule for the workshop providing a breakdown of topics and timings Materials shared elsewhere: This workshop follows the accompanying training materials: https://www.melbournebioinformatics.org.au/tutorials/tutorials/janis_translate/janis_translate   A recording of the workshop is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube channel: https://youtu.be/0IiY1GEx_BY Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, CWL, Galaxy
WORKSHOP: Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research’. This workshop took place over two, 3 hour sessions on 18-19 May 2023.

Event description

Processing and analysing omics datasets poses many...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-core

WORKSHOP: Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-unlocking-nf-core-customising-workflows-for-your-research This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research’. This workshop took place over two, 3 hour sessions on 18-19 May 2023. Event description Processing and analysing omics datasets poses many challenges to life scientists, particularly when we need to share our methods with other researchers and scale up our research. Public and reproducible bioinformatics workflows, like those developed by nf-core, are invaluable resources for the life science community. nf-core is a community-driven effort to provide high-quality bioinformatics workflows for common analyses including, RNAseq, mapping, variant calling, and single cell transcriptomics. A big advantage of using nf-core workflows is the ability to customise and optimise them for different computational environments, types and sizes of data and research goals.  This workshop will set you up with the foundational knowledge required to run and customise nf-core workflows in a reproducible manner. On day 1 you will learn about the nf-core tools utility, and step through the code structure of nf-core workflows. Then on day 2, using the nf-core/rnaseq workflow as an example, you will explore the various ways to adjust the workflow parameters, customise processes, and configure the workflow for your computational environment. This workshop event and accompanying materials were developed by the Sydney Informatics Hub, University of Sydney in partnership with Seqera Labs, Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre, and Australia’s National Research Education Network (AARNet). The workshop was enabled through the Australian BioCommons - Bring Your Own Data Platforms project (Australian Research Data Commons and NCRIS via Bioplatforms Australia).  Materials Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. nfcore_Schedule: Schedule for the workshop providing a breakdown of topics and timings nfcore_Q_and_A: Archive of questions and their answers from the workshop Slack Channel. Materials shared elsewhere: This workshop follows the accompanying training materials that were developed by the Sydney Informatics Hub, University of Sydney in partnership with Seqera Labs, Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre, and Australia’s National Research Education Network (AARNet).  https://sydney-informatics-hub.github.io/customising-nfcore-workshop Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-core
WORKSHOP: RNA-Seq: reads to differential genes and pathways

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘RNA-Seq: reads to differential genes and pathways’. This workshop took place over two, 3.5 hour sessions on 27 and 28 September 2022.

Event description

RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is a common method...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Analysis, Transcriptomics, RNA-seq, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-co.re

WORKSHOP: RNA-Seq: reads to differential genes and pathways https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-rna-seq-reads-to-differential-genes-and-pathways This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘RNA-Seq: reads to differential genes and pathways’. This workshop took place over two, 3.5 hour sessions on 27 and 28 September 2022. **Event description** RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is a common method used to understand the differences in gene expression and molecular pathways between two or more groups. This workshop introduces the fundamental concepts of RNA sequencing experiments and will allow you to try out the analysis using data from a study of Williams-Beuren Syndrome, a rare disease.  In the first part of the workshop you will learn how to convert sequence reads into analysis ready count data. To do this we will use nf-core/rnaseq - a portable, scalable, reproducible and publicly available workflow on Pawsey Nimbus Cloud. In the second part of the workshop you will use the count data you created to identify differential genes and pathways using R/Rstudio. By the end of the workshop, you should be able to perform your own RNA-seq analysis for differential gene expression and pathway analysis! This workshop is presented by the Australian BioCommons and Sydney Informatics Hub with the assistance of a network of facilitators from the national Bioinformatics Training Cooperative. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** * Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. * Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. * RNAseq reads to differential genes and pathways - Additional Resources (PDF): Additional resources compiled by the Sydney Informatics Hub * rnaseq_DE_analysis_Day2.html: HTML version of code used on day 2 of the workshop * rnaseq_DE_analysis_Day2.Rmd: R Markdown version of code used on day 2 of the workshop * RNAseq reads to differential genes and pathways_Q_and_A (PDF): Archive of questions and their answers from the workshop Slack Channel. **Materials shared elsewhere:** This workshop follows the tutorial ‘RNA-seq: reads to differential gene expression workshop series’ developed by the Sydney Informatics Hub. https://sydney-informatics-hub.github.io/training.RNAseq.series-quarto/ Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Analysis, Transcriptomics, RNA-seq, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-co.re
WEBINAR: Portable, reproducible and scalable bioinformatics workflows using Nextflow and Pawsey Nimbus Cloud

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Portable, reproducible and scalable bioinformatics workflows using Nextflow and Pawsey Nimbus Cloud’. This webinar took place on 20 September 2022.

Event description 

Bioinformatics workflows can...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, Containerisation

WEBINAR: Portable, reproducible and scalable bioinformatics workflows using Nextflow and Pawsey Nimbus Cloud https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-portable-reproducible-and-scalable-bioinformatics-workflows-using-nextflow-and-pawsey-nimbus-cloud This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Portable, reproducible and scalable bioinformatics workflows using Nextflow and Pawsey Nimbus Cloud’. This webinar took place on 20 September 2022. **Event description**  Bioinformatics workflows can support portable, reproducible and scalable analysis of omics datasets but using workflows can be challenging for both beginners and experienced bioinformaticians. Beginners face a steep learning curve to be able to build and deploy their own bioinformatics workflows while those with more experience face challenges productionising and scaling code for custom workflows and big data.  Bioinformaticians across the world are using Nextflow to build and manage workflows. Many of these workflows are shared for others to use and supported by the community via nf-co.re. So far, 39 workflows for omics data are available with another 23 under development. These workflows cover common analyses such as RNAseq, mapping, variant calling, single cell transcriptomics and more and can be easily deployed by anyone, regardless of skill level. In this webinar, Nandan Deshpande from the Sydney Informatics Hub, University of Sydney, will discuss how you can deploy freely available Nextflow (nf.co-re) bioinformatics workflows with a single command. We describe how you can quickly get started deploying these workflows using Pawsey Nimbus Cloud. For advanced users, we introduce you to Nextflow concepts to get you started with building your own workflows that will save you time and support reproducible, portable and scalable analysis. In the latter half of the webinar, Sarah Beecroft from the Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre will talk about their Nimbus Cloud systems. While Nextflow supports portability and can run on many computing infrastructures, we describe why we specifically love using Nimbus with Nextflow for many bioinformatics projects. We will describe some of the nf.co-re workflows that we have used on Nimbus and the research outcomes. We will also cover when not to use Nimbus and the alternatives we recommend.   Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: * Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. * Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. * Nextflow_Nimbus_slides (PDF): A PDF copy of the slides presented during the webinar. Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/VnLX63yXbJU Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, Containerisation