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Keywords: Genomics 


WEBINAR: Protection of genomic data and the Australian Privacy Act: when is genomic data 'personal information'?

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Protection of genomic data and the Australian Privacy Act: when is genomic data ‘personal information’?’. This webinar took place on 6 April 2022.

Event description

It is easy to assume that...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Genomics, Genetic data, Personal information, Health information, Privacy

WEBINAR: Protection of genomic data and the Australian Privacy Act: when is genomic data 'personal information'? https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-protection-of-genomic-data-and-the-australian-privacy-act-when-is-genomic-data-personal-information This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Protection of genomic data and the Australian Privacy Act: when is genomic data ‘personal information’?’. This webinar took place on 6 April 2022. **Event description** It is easy to assume that genomic data will be captured by legal definitions of ‘health information’ and ‘genetic information’, but the legal meaning of ‘genetic information’ need not align with scientific categories.  There are many different types of genomic data, with varied characteristics, uses and applications.  Clarifying when genomic data is covered by the Privacy Act 1988 (Cth) is an ongoing evaluative exercise but is important for at least 3 reasons:  1. those subject to the Privacy Act need to be able to confidently navigate their responsibilities 2. understanding current controls is a prerequisite for meaningful external critique (and this is particularly important at a time when the Privacy Act is under review), and 3. while legislation that applies to state public sector agencies is generally distinct from the Privacy Act there are similarities that extend the relevance of the question when is genomic data ‘personal information’ under the Privacy Act? In this presentation, Mark will explore the relationship between the legal concept of genetic information and the concept of genomic data relevant to health and medical research, reflect on the characteristics of each, and the possibility Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - Taylor_Slides (PDF): A PDF copy of the slides presented during the webinar. **Materials shared elsewhere:** A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/Iaei-9Gu-AI Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Genomics, Genetic data, Personal information, Health information, Privacy
WEBINAR: Conservation genomics in the age of extinction

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Conservation genomics in the age of extinction’. This webinar took place on 8 March 2022.

Event description

Biodiversity is crashing and millions of plant and animal species are at the edge of...

Keywords: Conservation genomics, Genomics, Bioinformatics, Sequencing, Threatened Species Initiative, Galaxy Australia

WEBINAR: Conservation genomics in the age of extinction https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-conservation-genomics-in-the-age-of-extinction This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Conservation genomics in the age of extinction’. This webinar took place on 8 March 2022. **Event description** Biodiversity is crashing and millions of plant and animal species are at the edge of extinction. Understanding the genetic diversity of these species is an important tool for conservation biology but obtaining high quality genomes for threatened species is not always straightforward. In this webinar Dr Carolyn Hogg speaks about the work she has been doing with the Threatened Species Initiative to build genomic resources to understand and protect Australia’s threatened species. Using examples such as the Kroombit Tinker Frog and the Greater Bilby, Carolyn describes some of the complexities and challenges of generating genomes from short reads and HiFi reads for critically endangered species. She outlines the technologies and resources being used and how these are bridging the gap between genomicists, bioinformaticians and conservation experts to help save Australian species. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. **Materials shared elsewhere:** A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/Bl7CaiGQ91s   Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Conservation genomics, Genomics, Bioinformatics, Sequencing, Threatened Species Initiative, Galaxy Australia
WEBINAR: Establishing Gen3 to enable better human genome data sharing in Australia

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Establishing Gen3 to enable better human genome data sharing in Australia’. This webinar took place on 16 February 2022.

Event description

Australian human genome initiatives are generating vast...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Genomics, Human genomics, Digital infrastructure, Gen3, Data sharing, Data management

WEBINAR: Establishing Gen3 to enable better human genome data sharing in Australia https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-establishing-gen3-to-enable-better-human-genome-data-sharing-in-australia This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Establishing Gen3 to enable better human genome data sharing in Australia’. This webinar took place on 16 February 2022. **Event description** Australian human genome initiatives are generating vast amounts of human genome data. There is a desire and need to share data with collaborators but researchers face significant infrastructural, technical and administrative barriers in achieving this. To efficiently share and distribute their genome data they need scalable services and infrastructure that: is easily administered; allows for the efficient data management; enables sharing and interoperability; and is aligned with global standards for human genome data sharing. Australian BioCommons has brought together a team from Zero Childhood Cancer (Zero), the University of Melbourne Centre for Cancer Research (UMCCR) and Australian Access Federation to explore the use of Gen3 technology. Establishing systems for easier management and sharing of their human genome data holdings is no simple task, and the group wants to ensure that other Australian providers and Institutions can benefit from their experience and easily deploy the same solution in the future. Gen3 is an open source software suite that makes use of private and public clouds to tackle the challenges of data management, interoperability, data sharing and analysis. It has been used in several very large NIH-funded projects that collectively house and describe data derived from hundreds of thousands of human samples (e.g. NCI Genomic Data Commons, BioData Catalyst, BloodPAC, BrainCommons, Kids First Data Commons). In this webinar you’ll hear from UMCCR and Zero about their experiences and progress towards establishing Gen3 instances to better enable better human genome data sharing in Australia. They will outline the challenges and opportunities that have arisen through this Australian BioCommons project and demonstrate the capabilities of Gen3 for human genome research. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - Gen3_Webinar_Slides (PDF): Slides presented during the webinar **Materials shared elsewhere:** A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/1F6B03Byigk Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Genomics, Human genomics, Digital infrastructure, Gen3, Data sharing, Data management
WORKSHOP: Refining genome annotations with Apollo

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons  workshop ‘Refining genome annotations with Apollo’. This workshop took place on 17 November 2021.

Workshop description

Genome annotation is crucial to defining the function of genomic sequences. This...

Keywords: Apollo Software, Bioinformatics, Analysis, Workflows, Genomics, Genome annotation

WORKSHOP: Refining genome annotations with Apollo https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-refining-genome-annotations-with-apollo This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons  workshop ‘Refining genome annotations with Apollo’. This workshop took place on 17 November 2021. **Workshop description** Genome annotation is crucial to defining the function of genomic sequences. This process typically involves a round of automated annotation followed by manual curation. Manual curation allows you to visualise your annotations so you can understand what your organism looks like, and then to manually refine these annotations along with any additional data you might have. This process is typically performed collaboratively as part of a team effort. Apollo is a popular tool for facilitating real-time collaborative, manual curation and genome annotation editing. In this workshop we will learn how to use Apollo to refine genome annotations using example data from an E. coli strain. We’ll focus on the basics like getting data into Apollo, viewing evidence tracks, editing and adding structural and functional annotation, visualising the results and collaborating on genome annotations. This workshop made use of a training instance of  the new Australian Apollo Service. This service enables Australian-based research groups and consortia to access Apollo and host genome assembly and supporting evidence files for free. This service has been made possible by The Australian BioCommons and partners at QCIF and Pawsey. To learn more about the Australian Apollo Service you can watch the Australian Apollo Launch Webinar. This workshop was presented by the Australian BioCommons and Queensland Cyber Infrastructure Foundation (QCIF) . The Australian Apollo Service is operated by QCIF and underpinned by computational resources provided by the Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre and receives NCRIS funding through Bioplatforms Australia and the Australian Research Data Commons as well as Queensland Government RICF funding. The training materials presented in this workshop were developed by Anthony Bretaudeau, Helena Rasche, Nathan Dunn, Mateo Boudet for the Galaxy Training Network. Helena and Anthony are part of the Gallantries project which is supported by Erasmus Programme of the European Union. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - Schedule (PDF): A breakdown of the topics and timings for the workshop - 2021 Apollo Training Intro (PPTX and PDF): Slides used to introduce the Australian Apollo Service - Augustus.gff3 (gff3): E.coli derived data file used in the tutorial. Data was obtained from the Galaxy Training Network and pre-processed using Galaxy Australia. - Blastp_vs_swissprot.gff3: E.coli derived data file used in the tutorial. Data was obtained from the Galaxy Training Network and pre-processed using Galaxy Australia. **Materials shared elsewhere:** This workshop is based on the tutorial ‘Refining genome annotations with Apollo’ which was developed for the Galaxy Training Network. Anthony Bretaudeau, Helena Rasche, Nathan Dunn, Mateo Boudet, Erasmus Programme, 2021 Refining Genome Annotations with Apollo (Galaxy Training Materials). https://training.galaxyproject.org/training-material/topics/genome-annotation/tutorials/apollo/tutorial.html Online; accessed Wed Dec 15 2021 See also: Batut et al., 2018 Community-Driven Data Analysis Training for Biology Cell Systems 10.1016/j.cels.2018.05.012 Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Apollo Software, Bioinformatics, Analysis, Workflows, Genomics, Genome annotation
WORKSHOP: Hybrid de novo genome assembly

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Hybrid de novo genome assembly’. This workshop took place on 7 October 2021.

Workshop description

It’s now easier than ever to assemble new reference genomes thanks to hybrid genome assembly...

Keywords: Galaxy Australia, Bioinformatics, Analysis, Workflows, Genomics, Genome assembly, De novo assembly

WORKSHOP: Hybrid de novo genome assembly https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-hybrid-de-novo-genome-assembly This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Hybrid de novo genome assembly’. This workshop took place on 7 October 2021. **Workshop description** It’s now easier than ever to assemble new reference genomes thanks to hybrid genome assembly approaches which enable research on organisms for which reference genomes were not previously available. These approaches combine the strengths of short (Illumina) and long (PacBio or Nanopore) read technologies, resulting in improved assembly quality. In this workshop we will learn how to create and assess genome assemblies from Illumina and Nanopore reads using data from a Bacillus Subtilis strain. We will demonstrate two hybrid-assembly methods using the tools Flye, Pilon, and Unicycler to perform assembly and subsequent error correction. You will learn how to visualise input read sets and the assemblies produced at each stage and assess the quality of the final assembly. All analyses will be performed using Galaxy Australia, an online platform for biological research that allows people to use computational data analysis tools and workflows without the need for programming experience. This workshop is presented by the Australian BioCommons and Melbourne Bioinformatics with the assistance of a network of facilitators from the national Bioinformatics Training Cooperative. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - Schedule (PDF): A breakdown of the topics and timings for the workshop **Materials shared elsewhere:** This workshop follows the tutorial ‘Hybrid genome assembly - Nanopore and Illumina’ developed by Melbourne Bioinformatics. https://www.melbournebioinformatics.org.au/tutorials/tutorials/hybrid_assembly/nanopore_assembly/ Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Galaxy Australia, Bioinformatics, Analysis, Workflows, Genomics, Genome assembly, De novo assembly
WORKSHOP: Working with genomics sequences and features in R with Bioconductor

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Working with genomics sequences and features in R with Bioconductor’. This workshop took place on 23 September 2021.

Workshop description

Explore the many useful functions that the Bioconductor...

Keywords: R software, Bioconductor, Bioinformatics, Analysis, Genomics, Sequence analysis

WORKSHOP: Working with genomics sequences and features in R with Bioconductor https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-working-with-genomics-sequences-and-features-in-r-with-bioconductor This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Working with genomics sequences and features in R with Bioconductor’. This workshop took place on 23 September 2021. **Workshop description** Explore the many useful functions that the Bioconductor environment offers for working with genomic data and other biological sequences.  DNA and proteins are often represented as files containing strings of nucleic acids or amino acids. They are associated with text files that provide additional contextual information such as genome annotations. This workshop provides hands-on experience with tools, software and packages available in R via Bioconductor for manipulating, exploring and extracting information from biological sequences and annotation files. We will look at tools for working with some commonly used file formats including FASTA, GFF3, GTF, methods for identifying regions of interest, and easy methods for obtaining data packages such as genome assemblies.  This workshop is presented by the Australian BioCommons and Monash Bioinformatics Platform with the assistance of a network of facilitators from the national Bioinformatics Training Cooperative. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - Schedule (PDF): schedule for the workshop providing a breakdown of topics and timings **Materials shared elsewhere:** This workshop follows the tutorial ‘Working with DNA sequences and features in R with Bioconductor - version 2’ developed for Monash Bioinformatics Platform and Monash Data Fluency by Paul Harrison. https://monashdatafluency.github.io/r-bioc-2/ Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) R software, Bioconductor, Bioinformatics, Analysis, Genomics, Sequence analysis
WEBINAR: Launching the new Apollo Service: collaborative genome annotation for Australian researchers

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Launching the new Apollo Service: collaborative genome annotation for Australian researchers’. This webinar/workshop took place on 29 September 2021.

Event description

Genome annotation is crucial...

Keywords: Genome Annotation, Genomics, Genome curation, Bioinformatics, Apollo software

WEBINAR: Launching the new Apollo Service: collaborative genome annotation for Australian researchers https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-launching-the-new-apollo-service-collaborative-genome-annotation-for-australian-researchers This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Launching the new Apollo Service: collaborative genome annotation for Australian researchers’. This webinar/workshop took place on 29 September 2021. **Event description** Genome annotation is crucial to defining the function of genomic sequences. Apollo is a popular tool for facilitating real-time collaborative curation and genome annotation editing. The technical obstacles faced by Australian researchers wanting to access and maintain this software have now been solved.  The new Australian Apollo Service can host your genome assembly and supporting evidence files, taking care of all the system administration so you and your team can focus on the annotation curation itself. The Australian BioCommons and partners at QCIF and Pawsey are now offering the Apollo Service free to use for Australian-based research groups and research consortia. As part of this launch, you’ll hear what’s possible from some of the early adopters who helped guide the development of the service. These Australian researchers will highlight the benefits that Apollo is bringing to their genome annotation and curation workflows. Join us to find out how you can get access to the Australian Apollo Service. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - Degnan Lab - Apollo Launch Webinar (PDF): Slides presented by Professors Sandie and Bernie Degnan - Nelson - Apollo Launch Webinar (PDF): Slides presented by Dr Tiffanie Nelson - Voelker - Apollo Launch Webinar (PDF): Slides presented by Julia Voelker - Rane - Apollo Launch Webinar (PDF): Slides presented by Dr Rahul Rane. **Materials shared elsewhere:** A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/o8jhRra-x4Y   Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Genome Annotation, Genomics, Genome curation, Bioinformatics, Apollo software
WEBINAR: Detection of and phasing of hybrid accessions in a target capture dataset

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Detection of and phasing of hybrid accessions in a target capture dataset’. This webinar took place on 10 June 2021.

Hybridisation plays an important role in evolution, leading to the exchange of genes...

Keywords: Phylogenetics, Bioinformatics, Phylogeny, Genomics, Target capture sequencing

WEBINAR: Detection of and phasing of hybrid accessions in a target capture dataset https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-detection-of-and-phasing-of-hybrid-accessions-in-a-target-capture-dataset This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Detection of and phasing of hybrid accessions in a target capture dataset’. This webinar took place on 10 June 2021. Hybridisation plays an important role in evolution, leading to the exchange of genes between species and, in some cases, generate new lineages. The use of molecular methods has revealed the frequency and importance of reticulation events is higher than previously thought and this insight continues with the ongoing development of phylogenomic methods that allow novel insights into the role and extent of hybridisation. Hybrids notoriously provide challenges for the reconstruction of evolutionary relationships, as they contain conflicting genetic information from their divergent parental lineages. However, this also provides the opportunity to gain insights into the origin of hybrids (including autopolyploids). This webinar explores some of the challenges and opportunities that occur when hybrids are included in a target capture sequence dataset. In particular, it describes the impact of hybrid accessions on sequence assembly and phylogenetic analysis and further explores how the information of the conflicting phylogenetic signal can be used to detect and resolve hybrid accessions. The webinar showcases a novel bioinformatic workflow, HybPhaser, that can be used to detect and phase hybrids in target capture datasets and will provide the theoretical background and concepts behind the workflow. This webinar is part of a series of webinars and workshops developed by the Genomics for Australian Plants (GAP) Initiative that focuses on the analysis of target capture sequence data. In addition to two public webinars, the GAP bioinformatics working group is offering training workshops in the use of newly developed and existing scripts in an integrated workflow to participants in the 2021 virtual Australasian Systematic Botany Society Conference. The materials are shared under a Creative Commons 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - Nauheimer_hybphaser_slides (PDF): Slides presented during the webinar **Materials shared elsewhere:** A recording of the webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/japXwTAhA5U Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Phylogenetics, Bioinformatics, Phylogeny, Genomics, Target capture sequencing
WEBINAR: Conflict in multi-gene datasets: why it happens and what to do about it - deep coalescence, paralogy and reticulation

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Conflict in multi-gene datasets: why it happens and what to do about it - deep coalescence, paralogy and reticulation’. This webinar took place on 20 May 2021.

Multi-gene datasets used in phylogenetic...

Keywords: Phylogenetics, Bioinformatics, Phylogeny, Genomics, Target capture sequencing

WEBINAR: Conflict in multi-gene datasets: why it happens and what to do about it - deep coalescence, paralogy and reticulation https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-conflict-in-multi-gene-datasets-why-it-happens-and-what-to-do-about-it-deep-coalescence-paralogy-and-reticulation This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Conflict in multi-gene datasets: why it happens and what to do about it - deep coalescence, paralogy and reticulation’. This webinar took place on 20 May 2021. Multi-gene datasets used in phylogenetic analyses, such as those produced by the sequence capture or target enrichment used in the Genomics for Australian Plants: Australian Angiosperm Tree of Life project, often show discordance between individual gene trees and between gene and species trees. This webinar explores three different forms of discordance: deep coalescence, paralogy, and reticulation. In each case, it considers underlying biological processes, how discordance presents in the data, and what bioinformatic or phylogenetic approaches and tools are available to address these challenges. It covers Yang and Smith paralogy resolution and general information on options for phylogenetic analysis. This webinar is part of a series of webinars and workshops developed by the Genomics for Australian Plants (GAP) Initiative that focused on the analysis of target capture sequence data. In addition to two public webinars, the GAP bioinformatics working group is offering training workshops in the use of newly developed and existing scripts in an integrated workflow to participants in the 2021 virtual Australasian Systematic Botany Society Conference. The materials are shared under a Creative Commons 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - Schmidt-Lebuhn - paralogy lineage sorting reticulation - slides (PDF): Slides presented during the webinar **Materials shared elsewhere:** A recording of the webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/1bw81q898z8 Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Phylogenetics, Bioinformatics, Phylogeny, Genomics, Target capture sequencing