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Keywords: Data visualisation  or GPUs 


WORKSHOP: R: fundamental skills for biologists

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘R: fundamental skills for biologists’. This workshop took place over four, three-hour sessions on 1, 8, 15 and 22 June 2022.

 

Event description

Biologists need data analysis skills to be able to...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Analysis, Statistics, R software, RStudio, Data visualisation

WORKSHOP: R: fundamental skills for biologists https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-r-fundamental-skills-for-biologists-81aa00db-63ad-4962-a7ac-b885bf9f676b This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘R: fundamental skills for biologists’. This workshop took place over four, three-hour sessions on 1, 8, 15 and 22 June 2022.   Event description Biologists need data analysis skills to be able to interpret, visualise and communicate their research results. While Excel can cover some data analysis needs, there is a better choice, particularly for large and complex datasets.  R is a free, open-source software and programming language that enables data exploration, statistical analysis, visualisation and more. The large variety of R packages available for analysing biological data make it a robust and flexible option for data of all shapes and sizes.  Getting started can be a little daunting for those without a background in statistics and programming. In this workshop we will equip you with the foundations for getting the most out of R and RStudio, an interactive way of structuring and keeping track of your work in R. Using biological data from a model of influenza infection, you will learn how to efficiently and reproducibly organise, read, wrangle, analyse, visualise and generate reports from your data in R. Topics covered in this workshop include: Spreadsheets, organising data and first steps with R Manipulating and analysing data with dplyr Data visualisation Summarized experiments and getting started with Bioconductor   This workshop is presented by the Australian BioCommons and Saskia Freytag from WEHI  with the assistance of a network of facilitators from the national Bioinformatics Training Cooperative. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Schedule (PDF): A breakdown of the topics and timings for the workshop Recommended resources (PDF): A list of resources recommended by trainers and participants Q_and_A(PDF): Archive of questions and their answers from the workshop Slack Channel. Materials shared elsewhere:   This workshop follows the tutorial ‘Introduction to data analysis with R and Bioconductor’ which is publicly available. https://saskiafreytag.github.io/biocommons-r-intro/ This is derived from material produced as part of The Carpentries Incubator project https://carpentries-incubator.github.io/bioc-intro/ Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Analysis, Statistics, R software, RStudio, Data visualisation
OpenCL

Supercomputers make use of accelerators from a variety of different hardware vendors, using devices such as multi-core CPU’s, GPU’s and even FPGA’s. OpenCL is a way for your HPC application to make effective use of heterogeneous computing devices, and to avoid code refactoring for new HPC...

Keywords: OpenCL, supercomputing, CPUs, GPUs, FPGAs, HPC

OpenCL https://dresa.org.au/materials/opencl-3eabb316-794d-4f46-959a-725be3ae1bde Supercomputers make use of accelerators from a variety of different hardware vendors, using devices such as multi-core CPU’s, GPU’s and even FPGA’s. OpenCL is a way for your HPC application to make effective use of heterogeneous computing devices, and to avoid code refactoring for new HPC infrastructure. Topics covered in this course are : - Introduction to OpenCL - How to build and run applications on Setonix with OpenCL and MPI - Matrix multiplication with OpenCL – fully explained line by line - How to debug OpenCL applications and kernels - Measure performance with OpenCL Events and open source tools - Memory management - Coarse and fine-grained shared memory - Strategies for building optimised OpenCL kernels - Optimise IO performance with asynchronous operations training@pawsey.org.au OpenCL, supercomputing, CPUs, GPUs, FPGAs, HPC
PCon Preparing applications for El Capitan and beyond

As Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL) prepares to stand up its next supercomputer, El Capitan, application teams prepare to pivot to another GPU architecture.

This talk presents how the LLNL application teams made the transition from distributed-memory, CPU-only architectures to...

Keywords: GPUs, supercomputing, HPC, PaCER

PCon Preparing applications for El Capitan and beyond https://dresa.org.au/materials/pcon-preparing-applications-for-el-capitan-and-beyond As Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL) prepares to stand up its next supercomputer, El Capitan, application teams prepare to pivot to another GPU architecture. This talk presents how the LLNL application teams made the transition from distributed-memory, CPU-only architectures to GPUs. They share institutional best practices. They discuss new open-source software products as tools for porting and profiling applications and as avenues for collaboration across the computational science community. Join LLNL's Erik Draeger and Jane Herriman, who presented this talk at Pawsey's PaCER Conference in September 2023. training@pawsey.org.au Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre GPUs, supercomputing, HPC, PaCER masters phd researcher ecr support professional ugrad
OpenCL

Supercomputers make use of accelerators from a variety of different hardware vendors, using devices such as multi-core CPU’s, GPU’s and even FPGA’s. OpenCL is a way for your HPC application to make effective use of heterogeneous computing devices, and to avoid code refactoring for new HPC...

Keywords: supercomputing, Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, CPUs, GPUs, OpenCL, FPGAs

Resource type: activity

OpenCL https://dresa.org.au/materials/opencl Supercomputers make use of accelerators from a variety of different hardware vendors, using devices such as multi-core CPU’s, GPU’s and even FPGA’s. OpenCL is a way for your HPC application to make effective use of heterogeneous computing devices, and to avoid code refactoring for new HPC infrastructure. training@pawsey.org.au Toby Potter supercomputing, Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, CPUs, GPUs, OpenCL, FPGAs masters ecr researcher support
AMD Profiling

The AMD profiling workshop covers the AMD suite of tools for development of HPC applications on AMD GPUs.

You will learn how to use the rocprof profiler and trace visualization tool that has long been available as part of the ROCm software suite.

You will also learn how to use the new...

Keywords: supercomputing, performance, GPUs, CPUs, AMD, HPC, ROCm

Resource type: activity

AMD Profiling https://dresa.org.au/materials/amd-profiling The AMD profiling workshop covers the AMD suite of tools for development of HPC applications on AMD GPUs. You will learn how to use the rocprof profiler and trace visualization tool that has long been available as part of the ROCm software suite. You will also learn how to use the new Omnitools - Omnitrace and Omniperf - that were introduced at the end of 2022. Omnitrace is a powerful tracing profiler for both CPU and GPU. It can collect data from a much wider range of sources and includes hardware counters and sampling approaches. Omniperf is a performance analysis tool that can help you pinpoint how your application is performing with a visual view of the memory hierarchy on the GPU as well as reporting the percentage of peak for many different measurements. training@pawsey.org.au supercomputing, performance, GPUs, CPUs, AMD, HPC, ROCm
HIP Workshop

The Heterogeneous Interface for Portability (HIP) provides a programming framework for harnessing the compute capabilities of multicore processors, such as the MI250X GPU’s on Setonix.

In this course we focus on the essentials of developing HIP applications with a focus on...

Keywords: HIP, supercomputing, Programming, GPUs, MPI, debugging

Resource type: full-course

HIP Workshop https://dresa.org.au/materials/hip-workshop The Heterogeneous Interface for Portability (HIP) provides a programming framework for harnessing the compute capabilities of multicore processors, such as the MI250X GPU’s on Setonix. In this course we focus on the essentials of developing HIP applications with a focus on supercomputing. Agenda - Introduction to HIP and high level features - How to build and run applications on Setonix with HIP and MPI - A complete line-by-line walkthrough of a HIP-enabled application - Tools and techniques for debugging and measuring the performance of HIP applications training@pawsey.org.au HIP, supercomputing, Programming, GPUs, MPI, debugging
WORKSHOP: R: fundamental skills for biologists

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘R: fundamental skills for biologists’. This workshop took place over four, three-hour sessions on 1, 8, 15 and 22 June 2022.

Event description

Biologists need data analysis skills to be able to...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Analysis, Statistics, R software, RStudio, Data visualisation

WORKSHOP: R: fundamental skills for biologists https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-r-fundamental-skills-for-biologists This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘R: fundamental skills for biologists’. This workshop took place over four, three-hour sessions on 1, 8, 15 and 22 June 2022. **Event description** Biologists need data analysis skills to be able to interpret, visualise and communicate their research results. While Excel can cover some data analysis needs, there is a better choice, particularly for large and complex datasets.  R is a free, open-source software and programming language that enables data exploration, statistical analysis, visualisation and more. The large variety of R packages available for analysing biological data make it a robust and flexible option for data of all shapes and sizes.  Getting started can be a little daunting for those without a background in statistics and programming. In this workshop we will equip you with the foundations for getting the most out of R and RStudio, an interactive way of structuring and keeping track of your work in R. Using biological data from a model of influenza infection, you will learn how to efficiently and reproducibly organise, read, wrangle, analyse, visualise and generate reports from your data in R. Topics covered in this workshop include: - Spreadsheets, organising data and first steps with R - Manipulating and analysing data with dplyr - Data visualisation - Summarized experiments and getting started with Bioconductor This workshop is presented by the Australian BioCommons and Saskia Freytag from WEHI  with the assistance of a network of facilitators from the national Bioinformatics Training Cooperative. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - Schedule (PDF): A breakdown of the topics and timings for the workshop - Recommended resources (PDF): A list of resources recommended by trainers and participants - Q_and_A(PDF): Archive of questions and their answers from the workshop Slack Channel. **Materials shared elsewhere:** This workshop follows the tutorial ‘Introduction to data analysis with R and Bioconductor’ which is publicly available. https://saskiafreytag.github.io/biocommons-r-intro/ This is derived from material produced as part of The Carpentries Incubator project https://carpentries-incubator.github.io/bioc-intro/ Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Analysis, Statistics, R software, RStudio, Data visualisation
Heurist Tutorials

A set of video tutorials with accompanying walkthroughs for building your first Heurist database and website. The first three tutorials show you how to get started in Heurist. The five subsequent tutorials introduce you to the five main menus in the Heurist interface.

Keywords: Heurist, Data management, Data visualisation, Digital Humanities, Databasing, website

Resource type: tutorial

Heurist Tutorials https://dresa.org.au/materials/heurist-tutorials A set of video tutorials with accompanying walkthroughs for building your first Heurist database and website. The first three tutorials show you how to get started in Heurist. The five subsequent tutorials introduce you to the five main menus in the Heurist interface. michael.falk@sydney.edu.au Johnson, Ian Osmakov, Artem Heurist, Data management, Data visualisation, Digital Humanities, Databasing, website mbr phd ecr researcher support
Porting the multi-GPU SELF-Fluids code to HIPFort

In this presentation by Dr. Joseph Schoonover of Fluid Numerics LLC, Joe shares their experience with the porting process for SELF-Fluids from multi-GPU CUDA-Fortran to multi-GPU HIPFort.

The presentation covers the design principles and roadmap for SELF and the strategy to port from...

Keywords: AMD, GPUs, supercomputer, supercomputing

Resource type: presentation

Porting the multi-GPU SELF-Fluids code to HIPFort https://dresa.org.au/materials/porting-the-multi-gpu-self-fluids-code-to-hipfort In this presentation by Dr. Joseph Schoonover of Fluid Numerics LLC, Joe shares their experience with the porting process for SELF-Fluids from multi-GPU CUDA-Fortran to multi-GPU HIPFort. The presentation covers the design principles and roadmap for SELF and the strategy to port from Nvidia-only platforms to AMD & Nvidia GPUs. Also discussed are the hurdles encountered along the way and considerations for developing multi-GPU accelerated applications in Fortran. SELF is an object-oriented Fortran library that supports the implementation of Spectral Element Methods for solving partial differential equations. SELF-Fluids is an implementation of SELF that solves the compressible Navier Stokes equations on CPU only and GPU accelerated compute platforms using the Discontinuous Galerkin Spectral Element Method. The SELF API is designed based on the assumption that SEM developers and researchers need to be able to implement derivatives in 1-D and divergence, gradient, and curl in 2-D and 3-D on scalar, vector, and tensor functions using spectral collocation, continuous Galerkin, and discontinuous Galerkin spectral element methods. The presentation discussion is placed in context of the Exascale era, where we're faced with a zoo of available compute hardware. Because of this, SELF routines provide support for GPU acceleration through AMD’s HIP and support for multi-core, multi-node, and multi-GPU platforms with MPI. training@pawsey.org.au AMD, GPUs, supercomputer, supercomputing
Embracing new solutions for in-situ visualisation

This PPT was used by Jean Favre, senior visualisation software engineer at CSCS, the Swiss National Supercomputing Centre during his presentation at P'Con '21 (Pawsey's first PaCER Conference).

This material discusses the upcoming release of ParaView v5.10, a leading scientific visualisation...

Keywords: ParaView, GPUs, supercomputer, supercomputing, visualisation, data visualisation

Resource type: presentation

Embracing new solutions for in-situ visualisation https://dresa.org.au/materials/embracing-new-solutions-for-in-situ-visualisation This PPT was used by Jean Favre, senior visualisation software engineer at CSCS, the Swiss National Supercomputing Centre during his presentation at P'Con '21 (Pawsey's first PaCER Conference). This material discusses the upcoming release of ParaView v5.10, a leading scientific visualisation application. In this release ParaView consolidates its implementation of the Catalyst API, a specification developed for simulations and scientific data producers to analyse and visualise data in situ. The material reviews some of the terminology and issues of different in-situ visualisation scenarios, then reviews early Data Adaptors for tight-coupling of simulations and visualisation solutions. This is followed by an introduction of Conduit, an intuitive model for describing hierarchical scientific data. Both ParaView-Catalyst and Ascent use Conduit’s Mesh Blueprint, a set of conventions to describe computational simulation meshes. Finally, the materials present CSCS’ early experience in adopting ParaView-Catalyst and Ascent via two concrete examples of instrumentation of some proxy numerical applications. training@pawsey.org.au ParaView, GPUs, supercomputer, supercomputing, visualisation, data visualisation