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Keywords: AI  or Phylogeny  or Workflows 


WORKSHOP: Online data analysis for biologists

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Online data analysis for biologists’. This workshop took place on 9 September 2021.

Workshop description

Galaxy is an online platform for biological research that allows people to use computational data...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Analysis, Workflows, Galaxy Australia

WORKSHOP: Online data analysis for biologists https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-online-data-analysis-for-biologists-08d66913-4ce3-4528-bdd6-0b0fcf234982 This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Online data analysis for biologists’. This workshop took place on 9 September 2021. Workshop description Galaxy is an online platform for biological research that allows people to use computational data analysis tools and workflows without the need for programming experience. It is an open source, web-based platform for accessible, reproducible, and transparent computational biomedical research. It also captures run information so that workflows can be saved, repeated and shared efficiently via the web. This interactive beginners workshop will provide an introduction to the Galaxy interface, histories and available tools. The material covered in this workshop is freely available through the Galaxy Training Network. The workshop will be held via Zoom and involves a combination of presentations by the lead trainer and smaller breakout groups supported by experienced facilitators. The materials are shared under a Creative Commons 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Schedule (PDF): schedule for the workshop Online_data_analysis_for_biologists_extraslides (PPTX and PDF): Slides used to introduce the data set and emphasise the importance of workflows. These slides were developed by Ms Grace Hall. Materials shared elsewhere: The tutorial used in this workshop is available via the Galaxy Training Network. Anne Fouilloux, Nadia Goué, Christopher Barnett, Michele Maroni, Olha Nahorna, Dave Clements, Saskia Hiltemann, 2021 Galaxy 101 for everyone (Galaxy Training Materials). https://training.galaxyproject.org/training-material/topics/introduction/tutorials/galaxy-intro-101-everyone/tutorial.html Online; accessed Fri Dec 10 2021 Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Analysis, Workflows, Galaxy Australia
WEBINAR: Detection of and phasing of hybrid accessions in a target capture dataset

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Detection of and phasing of hybrid accessions in a target capture dataset’. This webinar took place on 10 June 2021.

Hybridisation plays an important role in evolution, leading to the exchange of genes...

Keywords: Phylogenetics, Bioinformatics, Phylogeny, Genomics, Target capture sequencing

WEBINAR: Detection of and phasing of hybrid accessions in a target capture dataset https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-detection-of-and-phasing-of-hybrid-accessions-in-a-target-capture-dataset-51cc7740-0da1-45f1-95de-f1a47f676053 This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Detection of and phasing of hybrid accessions in a target capture dataset’. This webinar took place on 10 June 2021. Hybridisation plays an important role in evolution, leading to the exchange of genes between species and, in some cases, generate new lineages. The use of molecular methods has revealed the frequency and importance of reticulation events is higher than previously thought and this insight continues with the ongoing development of phylogenomic methods that allow novel insights into the role and extent of hybridisation. Hybrids notoriously provide challenges for the reconstruction of evolutionary relationships, as they contain conflicting genetic information from their divergent parental lineages. However, this also provides the opportunity to gain insights into the origin of hybrids (including autopolyploids). This webinar explores some of the challenges and opportunities that occur when hybrids are included in a target capture sequence dataset. In particular, it describes the impact of hybrid accessions on sequence assembly and phylogenetic analysis and further explores how the information of the conflicting phylogenetic signal can be used to detect and resolve hybrid accessions. The webinar showcases a novel bioinformatic workflow, HybPhaser, that can be used to detect and phase hybrids in target capture datasets and will provide the theoretical background and concepts behind the workflow. This webinar is part of a series of webinars and workshops developed by the Genomics for Australian Plants (GAP) Initiative that focuses on the analysis of target capture sequence data. In addition to two public webinars, the GAP bioinformatics working group is offering training workshops in the use of newly developed and existing scripts in an integrated workflow to participants in the 2021 virtual Australasian Systematic Botany Society Conference. The materials are shared under a Creative Commons 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Nauheimer_hybphaser_slides (PDF): Slides presented during the webinar Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of the webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/japXwTAhA5U Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Phylogenetics, Bioinformatics, Phylogeny, Genomics, Target capture sequencing
WEBINAR: Conflict in multi-gene datasets: why it happens and what to do about it - deep coalescence, paralogy and reticulation

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Conflict in multi-gene datasets: why it happens and what to do about it - deep coalescence, paralogy and reticulation’. This webinar took place on 20 May 2021.

Multi-gene datasets used in phylogenetic...

Keywords: Phylogenetics, Bioinformatics, Phylogeny, Genomics, Target capture sequencing

WEBINAR: Conflict in multi-gene datasets: why it happens and what to do about it - deep coalescence, paralogy and reticulation https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-conflict-in-multi-gene-datasets-why-it-happens-and-what-to-do-about-it-deep-coalescence-paralogy-and-reticulation-a6743550-b904-45e1-9635-4e481ee8f739 This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Conflict in multi-gene datasets: why it happens and what to do about it - deep coalescence, paralogy and reticulation’. This webinar took place on 20 May 2021. Multi-gene datasets used in phylogenetic analyses, such as those produced by the sequence capture or target enrichment used in the Genomics for Australian Plants: Australian Angiosperm Tree of Life project, often show discordance between individual gene trees and between gene and species trees. This webinar explores three different forms of discordance: deep coalescence, paralogy, and reticulation. In each case, it considers underlying biological processes, how discordance presents in the data, and what bioinformatic or phylogenetic approaches and tools are available to address these challenges. It covers Yang and Smith paralogy resolution and general information on options for phylogenetic analysis. This webinar is part of a series of webinars and workshops developed by the Genomics for Australian Plants (GAP) Initiative that focused on the analysis of target capture sequence data. In addition to two public webinars, the GAP bioinformatics working group is offering training workshops in the use of newly developed and existing scripts in an integrated workflow to participants in the 2021 virtual Australasian Systematic Botany Society Conference. The materials are shared under a Creative Commons 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Schmidt-Lebuhn - paralogy lineage sorting reticulation - slides (PDF): Slides presented during the webinar   Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of the webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/1bw81q898z8 Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Phylogenetics, Bioinformatics, Phylogeny, Genomics, Target capture sequencing
WEBINAR: Getting started with command line bioinformatics

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Getting started with command line bioinformatics’. This webinar took place on 22 June 2021. 

Bioinformatics skills are in demand like never before and biologists are stepping up to the challenge of...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Command line, Workflows, Bash, Computational biology

WEBINAR: Getting started with command line bioinformatics https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-getting-started-with-command-line-bioinformatics-248027d1-0773-485a-b511-831e2fd4cc64 This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Getting started with command line bioinformatics’. This webinar took place on 22 June 2021.  Bioinformatics skills are in demand like never before and biologists are stepping up to the challenge of learning to analyse large and ever growing datasets. Learning how to use the command line can open up many options for data analysis but getting started can be a little daunting for those without a background in computer science. Parice Brandies and Carolyn Hogg have recently put together ten simple rules for getting started with command-line bioinformatics to help biologists begin their computational journeys. In this webinar Parice walks you through their hints and tips for getting started with the command line. She covers topics like learning tech speak, evaluating your data and workflows, assessing computational requirements, computing options, the basics of software installation, curating and testing scripts, a bit of bash and keeping good records. The webinar will be followed by a short Q&A session. The slides were created by Parice Brandies and are based on the publication ‘Ten simple rules for getting started with command-line bioinformatics’ (https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1008645). The slides are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the webinar. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Getting started with command line bioinformatics - slides (PDF): Slides presented during the webinar Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of the webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel https://youtu.be/p7pA4OLB2X4 Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Hogg, Carolyn (type: Supervisor) Bioinformatics, Command line, Workflows, Bash, Computational biology
WORKSHOP: Translating workflows into Nextflow with Janis

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Translating workflows into Nextflow with Janis’. This workshop took place online on 19 June 2023.

Event description

Bioinformatics workflows are critical for reproducibly transferring methodologies...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, CWL, Galaxy

WORKSHOP: Translating workflows into Nextflow with Janis https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-translating-workflows-into-nextflow-with-janis-36386c6d-f9a2-4b4d-afa9-062ce3b8ac5d This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Translating workflows into Nextflow with Janis’. This workshop took place online on 19 June 2023. Event description Bioinformatics workflows are critical for reproducibly transferring methodologies between research groups and for scaling between computational infrastructures. Research groups currently invest a lot of time and effort in creating and updating workflows; the ability to translate from one workflow language into another can make them easier to share, and maintain with minimal effort. For example, research groups that would like to run an existing Galaxy workflow on HPC, or extend it for their use, might find translating the workflow to Nextflow more suitable for their ongoing use-cases.  Janis is a framework that provides an abstraction layer for describing workflows, and a tool that can translate workflows between existing languages such as CWL, WDL, Galaxy and Nextflow. Janis aims to translate as much as it can, leaving the user to validate the workflow and make small manual adjustments where direct translations are not possible. Originating from the Portable Pipelines Project between Melbourne Bioinformatics, the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, this tool is now available for everyone to use. This workshop provides an introduction to Janis and how it can be used to translate Galaxy and CWL based tools and workflows into Nextflow. Using hands-on examples we’ll step you through the process and demonstrate how to optimise, troubleshoot and test the translated workflows. This workshop event and accompanying materials were developed by the Melbourne Bioinformatics and the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre. The workshop was enabled through the Australian BioCommons - Bring Your Own Data Platforms project funded by the Australian Research Data Commons and NCRIS via Bioplatforms Australia.    Materials Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Intro to Galaxy (PDF): Slides presented during the workshop Intro to CWL (PDF): Slides presented during the workshop Intro to the session & Janis (PDF): Slides presented during the workshop Janis_Schedule (PDF): Schedule for the workshop providing a breakdown of topics and timings Materials shared elsewhere: This workshop follows the accompanying training materials: https://www.melbournebioinformatics.org.au/tutorials/tutorials/janis_translate/janis_translate   A recording of the workshop is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube channel: https://youtu.be/0IiY1GEx_BY Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, CWL, Galaxy
WORKSHOP: Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research’. This workshop took place over two, 3 hour sessions on 18-19 May 2023.

Event description

Processing and analysing omics datasets poses many...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-core

WORKSHOP: Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-unlocking-nf-core-customising-workflows-for-your-research-1584ff39-e007-4422-9fd5-4e407df6b6c5 This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research’. This workshop took place over two, 3 hour sessions on 18-19 May 2023. Event description Processing and analysing omics datasets poses many challenges to life scientists, particularly when we need to share our methods with other researchers and scale up our research. Public and reproducible bioinformatics workflows, like those developed by nf-core, are invaluable resources for the life science community. nf-core is a community-driven effort to provide high-quality bioinformatics workflows for common analyses including, RNAseq, mapping, variant calling, and single cell transcriptomics. A big advantage of using nf-core workflows is the ability to customise and optimise them for different computational environments, types and sizes of data and research goals.  This workshop will set you up with the foundational knowledge required to run and customise nf-core workflows in a reproducible manner. On day 1 you will learn about the nf-core tools utility, and step through the code structure of nf-core workflows. Then on day 2, using the nf-core/rnaseq workflow as an example, you will explore the various ways to adjust the workflow parameters, customise processes, and configure the workflow for your computational environment. This workshop event and accompanying materials were developed by the Sydney Informatics Hub, University of Sydney in partnership with Seqera Labs, Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre, and Australia’s National Research Education Network (AARNet). The workshop was enabled through the Australian BioCommons - Bring Your Own Data Platforms project (Australian Research Data Commons and NCRIS via Bioplatforms Australia).  Materials Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. nfcore_Schedule: Schedule for the workshop providing a breakdown of topics and timings nfcore_Q_and_A: Archive of questions and their answers from the workshop Slack Channel. Materials shared elsewhere: This workshop follows the accompanying training materials that were developed by the Sydney Informatics Hub, University of Sydney in partnership with Seqera Labs, Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre, and Australia’s National Research Education Network (AARNet).  https://sydney-informatics-hub.github.io/customising-nfcore-workshop Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-core
WEBINAR: Pro tips for scaling bioinformatics workflows to HPC

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Pro tips for scaling bioinformatics workflows to HPC’. This webinar took place on 31 May 2023.

Event description 

High Performance Computing (HPC) infrastructures offer the computational scale and...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, HPC, High Performance Computing

WEBINAR: Pro tips for scaling bioinformatics workflows to HPC https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-pro-tips-for-scaling-bioinformatics-workflows-to-hpc-9f2a8b90-88da-433b-83b2-b1ab262dd9df This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Pro tips for scaling bioinformatics workflows to HPC’. This webinar took place on 31 May 2023. Event description  High Performance Computing (HPC) infrastructures offer the computational scale and efficiency that life scientists need to handle complex biological datasets and multi-step computational workflows. But scaling workflows to HPC from smaller, more familiar computational infrastructures brings with it new jargon, expectations, and processes to learn. To make the most of HPC resources, bioinformatics workflows need to be designed for distributed computing environments and carefully manage varying resource requirements, and data scale related to biology.   In this webinar, Dr Georgina Samaha from the Sydney Informatics Hub, Dr Matthew Downton from the National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) and Dr Sarah Beecroft from the Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre help you navigate the world of HPC for running and developing bioinformatics workflows. They explain when you should take your workflows to HPC and highlight the architectural features you should make the most of to scale your analyses once you’re there. You’ll hear pro-tips for dealing with common pain points like software installation, optimising for parallel computing and resource management, and will find out how to get access to Australia’s National HPC infrastructures at NCI and Pawsey.  Materials Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Pro-tips_HPC_Slides: A PDF copy of the slides presented during the webinar. Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/YKJDRXCmGMo Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, HPC, High Performance Computing
WEBINAR: AlphaFold: what's in it for me?

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘WEBINAR: AlphaFold: what’s in it for me?’. This webinar took place on 18 April 2023.

Event description 

AlphaFold has taken the scientific world by storm with the ability to accurately predict the...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Machine Learning, Structural Biology, Proteins, Drug discovery, AlphaFold, AI, Artificial Intelligence, Deep learning

WEBINAR: AlphaFold: what's in it for me? https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-alphafold-what-s-in-it-for-me-4d1ea222-4240-4b68-b9ae-7769ac664ee0 This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘WEBINAR: AlphaFold: what’s in it for me?’. This webinar took place on 18 April 2023. Event description  AlphaFold has taken the scientific world by storm with the ability to accurately predict the structure of any protein in minutes using artificial intelligence (AI). From drug discovery to enzymes that degrade plastics, this promises to speed up and fundamentally change the way that protein structures are used in biological research.  Beyond the hype, what does this mean for structural biology as a field (and as a career)? Dr Craig Morton, Drug Discovery Lead at the CSIRO, is an early adopter of AlphaFold and has decades of expertise in protein structure / function, protein modelling, protein – ligand interactions and computational small molecule drug discovery, with particular interest in anti-infective agents for the treatment of bacterial and viral diseases. Craig joins this webinar to share his perspective on the implications of AlphaFold for science and structural biology. He will give an overview of how AlphaFold works, ways to access AlphaFold, and some examples of how it can be used for protein structure/function analysis. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/4ytn2_AiH8s Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Machine Learning, Structural Biology, Proteins, Drug discovery, AlphaFold, AI, Artificial Intelligence, Deep learning
WORKSHOP: Make your bioinformatics workflows findable and citable

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Make your bioinformatics workflows findable and citable’. This workshop took place on 21 March 2023.

Event description

Computational workflows are invaluable resources for research communities. They help...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, WorkflowHub, FAIR, Open Science

WORKSHOP: Make your bioinformatics workflows findable and citable https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-make-your-bioinformatics-workflows-findable-and-citable-74e85d1c-d869-429e-b942-8391f4bab23d This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Make your bioinformatics workflows findable and citable’. This workshop took place on 21 March 2023. Event description Computational workflows are invaluable resources for research communities. They help us  standardise common analyses, collaborate with other researchers, and support reproducibility. Bioinformatics workflow developers invest significant time and expertise to create, share, and maintain these resources for the benefit of the wider community and being able to easily find and access workflows is an essential factor in their uptake by the community. Increasingly, the research community is turning to workflow registries to find and access public workflows that can be applied to their research. Workflow registries support workflow findability and citation by providing a central repository and allowing users to search for and discover them easily. This workshop will introduce you to workflow registries and support attendees to register their workflows on the popular workflow registry, WorkflowHub. We’ll kick off the workshop with an introduction to the concepts underlying workflow findability, how it can benefit workflow developers, and how you can make the most of workflow registries to share your computational workflows with the research community. You will then have the opportunity to register your own workflows in WorkflowHub with support from our trainers.  Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. 2023-03-21_Workflows_slides (PDF): A copy of the slides presented during the workshop Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of the first part of this workshop is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/2kGKxaPuQN8 Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, WorkflowHub, FAIR, Open Science
WORKSHOP: RNA-Seq: reads to differential genes and pathways

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘RNA-Seq: reads to differential genes and pathways’. This workshop took place over two, 3.5 hour sessions on 27 and 28 September 2022.

Event description

RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is a common method used to...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Analysis, Transcriptomics, RNA-seq, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-co.re

WORKSHOP: RNA-Seq: reads to differential genes and pathways https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-rna-seq-reads-to-differential-genes-and-pathways-5a384156-d3de-4d5d-9797-e689bf6592f8 This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘RNA-Seq: reads to differential genes and pathways’. This workshop took place over two, 3.5 hour sessions on 27 and 28 September 2022. Event description RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is a common method used to understand the differences in gene expression and molecular pathways between two or more groups. This workshop introduces the fundamental concepts of RNA sequencing experiments and will allow you to try out the analysis using data from a study of Williams-Beuren Syndrome, a rare disease.  In the first part of the workshop you will learn how to convert sequence reads into analysis ready count data. To do this we will use nf-core/rnaseq - a portable, scalable, reproducible and publicly available workflow on Pawsey Nimbus Cloud. In the second part of the workshop you will use the count data you created to identify differential genes and pathways using R/Rstudio. By the end of the workshop, you should be able to perform your own RNA-seq analysis for differential gene expression and pathway analysis! This workshop is presented by the Australian BioCommons and Sydney Informatics Hub with the assistance of a network of facilitators from the national Bioinformatics Training Cooperative. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. RNAseq reads to differential genes and pathways - Additional Resources (PDF): Additional resources compiled by the Sydney Informatics Hub rnaseq_DE_analysis_Day2.html: HTML version of code used on day 2 of the workshop rnaseq_DE_analysis_Day2.Rmd: R Markdown version of code used on day 2 of the workshop RNAseq reads to differential genes and pathways_Q_and_A (PDF): Archive of questions and their answers from the workshop Slack Channel. Materials shared elsewhere: This workshop follows the tutorial ‘RNA-seq: reads to differential gene expression workshop series’ developed by the Sydney Informatics Hub. https://sydney-informatics-hub.github.io/training.RNAseq.series-quarto/ Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Analysis, Transcriptomics, RNA-seq, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-co.re
WEBINAR: Here's one we prepared earlier: (re)creating bioinformatics methods and workflows with Galaxy Australia

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Here’s one we prepared earlier: (re)creating bioinformatics methods and workflows with Galaxy Australia’. This webinar took place on 26 October 2022.

Event description 

Have you discovered a brilliant...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, FAIR, Galaxy Australia

WEBINAR: Here's one we prepared earlier: (re)creating bioinformatics methods and workflows with Galaxy Australia https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-here-s-one-we-prepared-earlier-re-creating-bioinformatics-methods-and-workflows-with-galaxy-australia-134a8bf5-3801-421f-a454-e0f9020f4871 This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Here’s one we prepared earlier: (re)creating bioinformatics methods and workflows with Galaxy Australia’. This webinar took place on 26 October 2022. Event description  Have you discovered a brilliant bioinformatics workflow but you’re not quite sure how to use it? In this webinar we will introduce the power of Galaxy for construction and (re)use of reproducible workflows, whether building workflows from scratch, recreating them from published descriptions and/or extracting from Galaxy histories. Using an established bioinformatics method, we’ll show you how to: Use the workflows creator in Galaxy Australia  Build a workflow based on a published method Annotate workflows so that you (and others) can understand them  Make workflows finable and citable (important and very easy to do!) Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. GalaxyWorkflows_Slides (PDF): A PDF copy of the slides presented during the webinar. Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/IMkl6p7hkho Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, FAIR, Galaxy Australia
WEBINAR: Portable, reproducible and scalable bioinformatics workflows using Nextflow and Pawsey Nimbus Cloud

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Portable, reproducible and scalable bioinformatics workflows using Nextflow and Pawsey Nimbus Cloud’. This webinar took place on 20 September 2022.

Event description 

Bioinformatics workflows can support...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, Containerisation

WEBINAR: Portable, reproducible and scalable bioinformatics workflows using Nextflow and Pawsey Nimbus Cloud https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-portable-reproducible-and-scalable-bioinformatics-workflows-using-nextflow-and-pawsey-nimbus-cloud-824bc004-4dcb-4bb5-b0dc-a207c44bbbe6 This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Portable, reproducible and scalable bioinformatics workflows using Nextflow and Pawsey Nimbus Cloud’. This webinar took place on 20 September 2022. Event description  Bioinformatics workflows can support portable, reproducible and scalable analysis of omics datasets but using workflows can be challenging for both beginners and experienced bioinformaticians. Beginners face a steep learning curve to be able to build and deploy their own bioinformatics workflows while those with more experience face challenges productionising and scaling code for custom workflows and big data.  Bioinformaticians across the world are using Nextflow to build and manage workflows. Many of these workflows are shared for others to use and supported by the community via nf-co.re. So far, 39 workflows for omics data are available with another 23 under development. These workflows cover common analyses such as RNAseq, mapping, variant calling, single cell transcriptomics and more and can be easily deployed by anyone, regardless of skill level. In this webinar, Nandan Deshpande from the Sydney Informatics Hub, University of Sydney, will discuss how you can deploy freely available Nextflow (nf.co-re) bioinformatics workflows with a single command. We describe how you can quickly get started deploying these workflows using Pawsey Nimbus Cloud. For advanced users, we introduce you to Nextflow concepts to get you started with building your own workflows that will save you time and support reproducible, portable and scalable analysis. In the latter half of the webinar, Sarah Beecroft from the Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre will talk about their Nimbus Cloud systems. While Nextflow supports portability and can run on many computing infrastructures, we describe why we specifically love using Nimbus with Nextflow for many bioinformatics projects. We will describe some of the nf.co-re workflows that we have used on Nimbus and the research outcomes. We will also cover when not to use Nimbus and the alternatives we recommend.   Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Nextflow_Nimbus_slides (PDF): A PDF copy of the slides presented during the webinar. Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/VnLX63yXbJU Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, Containerisation
WEBINAR: Getting started with whole genome mapping and variant calling on the command line

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Getting started with whole genome mapping and variant calling on the command line’. This webinar took place on 24 August 2022.

Event description 

Life scientists are increasingly using whole genome...

Keywords: Genome mapping, Variant calling, Bioinformatics, Workflows

WEBINAR: Getting started with whole genome mapping and variant calling on the command line https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-getting-started-with-whole-genome-mapping-and-variant-calling-on-the-command-line-2046f36b-0c7a-4523-9c21-08046900d3ff This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Getting started with whole genome mapping and variant calling on the command line’. This webinar took place on 24 August 2022. Event description  Life scientists are increasingly using whole genome sequencing (WGS) to ask and answer research questions across the tree of life. Before any of this work can be done, there is the essential but challenging task of processing raw sequencing data. Processing WGS data is a computationally challenging, multi-step process used to create a map of an individual’s genome and identify genetic variant sites. The tools you use in this process and overall workflow design can look very different for different researchers, it all depends on your dataset and the research questions you’re asking. Luckily, there are lots of existing WGS processing tools and pipelines out there, but knowing where to start and what your specific needs are is hard work, no matter how experienced you are.  In this webinar we will walk through the essential steps and considerations for researchers who are running and building reproducible WGS mapping and variant calling pipelines at the command line interface. We will discuss how to choose and evaluate a pipeline that is right for your dataset and research questions, and how to get access to the compute resources you need Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. WGS mapping and variant calling _slides (PDF): A PDF copy of the slides presented during the webinar.   Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/Q2EceFyizio Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Genome mapping, Variant calling, Bioinformatics, Workflows
WEBINAR: bio.tools - making it easier to find, understand and cite biological tools and software

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘bio.tools - making it easier to find, understand and cite biological tools and software’. This webinar took place on 21 June 2022.

Event description 

bio.tools provides easy access to essential scientific...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Research software, EDAM, Workflows, FAIR

WEBINAR: bio.tools - making it easier to find, understand and cite biological tools and software https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-bio-tools-making-it-easier-to-find-understand-and-cite-biological-tools-and-software-aea38c9e-0b40-4308-bafd-f7580563f520 This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘bio.tools - making it easier to find, understand and cite biological tools and software’. This webinar took place on 21 June 2022. Event description  bio.tools provides easy access to essential scientific and technical information about software, command-line tools, databases and services. It’s backed by ELIXIR, the European Infrastructure for Biological Information, and is being used in Australia to register software (e.g. Galaxy Australia, prokka). It underpins the information provided in the Australian BioCommons discovery service ToolFinder. Hans Ienasescu and Matúš Kalaš join us to explain how bio.tools uses a community driven, open science model to create this collection of resources and how it makes it easier to find, understand, utilise and cite them. They’ll delve into how bio.tools is using standard semantics (e.g. the EDAM ontology) and syntax (e.g. biotoolsSchema) to enrich the annotation and description of tools and resources. Finally, we’ll see how the community can contribute to bio.tools and take advantage of its key features to share and promote their own research software.   Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. biotools_EDAM_slides (PDF): A PDF copy of the slides presented during the webinar.   Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/K0J4_bAUG3Y Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Research software, EDAM, Workflows, FAIR
WORKSHOP: Introduction to Metabarcoding using QIIME2

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Introduction to Metabarcoding using QIIME2’. This workshop took place on 22 February 2022.

Event description

Metabarcoding has revolutionised the study of biodiversity science. By combining DNA taxonomy...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Analysis, Workflows, Microbial ecology, Metabarcoding, Microbiome

WORKSHOP: Introduction to Metabarcoding using QIIME2 https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-introduction-to-metabarcoding-using-qiime2-d3a7ac82-63aa-47e6-9d8e-5126419f9982 This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Introduction to Metabarcoding using QIIME2’. This workshop took place on 22 February 2022. Event description Metabarcoding has revolutionised the study of biodiversity science. By combining DNA taxonomy with high-throughput DNA sequencing, it offers the potential to observe a larger diversity in the taxa within a single sample, rapidly expanding the scope of microbial analysis and generating high-quality biodiversity data.  This workshop will introduce the topic of metabarcoding and how you can use Qiime2 to analyse 16S data and gain simultaneous identification of all taxa within a sample. Qiime2 is a popular tool used to perform powerful microbiome analysis that can transform your raw data into publication quality visuals and statistics. In this workshop, using example 16S data from the shallow-water marine anemone E. diaphana, you will learn how to use this pipeline to run essential steps in microbial analysis including generating taxonomic assignments and phylogenic trees, and performing both alpha- and beta- diversity analysis.  Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Schedule (PDF): A breakdown of the topics and timings for the workshop Materials shared elsewhere: This workshop follows the tutorial ‘Introduction to metabarcoding with QIIME2’ which has been made publicly available by Melbourne Bioinformatics. https://www.melbournebioinformatics.org.au/tutorials/tutorials/qiime2/qiime2/ Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Analysis, Workflows, Microbial ecology, Metabarcoding, Microbiome
WORKSHOP: Refining genome annotations with Apollo

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons  workshop ‘Refining genome annotations with Apollo’. This workshop took place on 17 November 2021.

Workshop description 

Genome annotation is crucial to defining the function of genomic sequences. This process...

Keywords: Apollo Software, Bioinformatics, Analysis, Workflows, Genomics, Genome annotation

WORKSHOP: Refining genome annotations with Apollo https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-refining-genome-annotations-with-apollo-d8f95fb3-7dc4-40e0-87d5-e7a4b2ceaf16 This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons  workshop ‘Refining genome annotations with Apollo’. This workshop took place on 17 November 2021. Workshop description  Genome annotation is crucial to defining the function of genomic sequences. This process typically involves a round of automated annotation followed by manual curation. Manual curation allows you to visualise your annotations so you can understand what your organism looks like, and then to manually refine these annotations along with any additional data you might have. This process is typically performed collaboratively as part of a team effort. Apollo is a popular tool for facilitating real-time collaborative, manual curation and genome annotation editing. In this workshop we will learn how to use Apollo to refine genome annotations using example data from an E. coli strain. We’ll focus on the basics like getting data into Apollo, viewing evidence tracks, editing and adding structural and functional annotation, visualising the results and collaborating on genome annotations. This workshop made use of a training instance of  the new Australian Apollo Service. This service enables Australian-based research groups and consortia to access Apollo and host genome assembly and supporting evidence files for free. This service has been made possible by The Australian BioCommons and partners at QCIF and Pawsey. To learn more about the Australian Apollo Service you can watch the Australian Apollo Launch Webinar. This workshop was presented by the Australian BioCommons and Queensland Cyber Infrastructure Foundation (QCIF) . The Australian Apollo Service is operated by QCIF and underpinned by computational resources provided by the Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre and receives NCRIS funding through Bioplatforms Australia and the Australian Research Data Commons as well as Queensland Government RICF funding. The training materials presented in this workshop were developed by Anthony Bretaudeau, Helena Rasche, Nathan Dunn, Mateo Boudet for the Galaxy Training Network. Helena and Anthony are part of the Gallantries project which is supported by Erasmus Programme of the European Union. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Schedule (PDF): A breakdown of the topics and timings for the workshop 2021 Apollo Training Intro (PPTX and PDF): Slides used to introduce the Australian Apollo Service Augustus.gff3 (gff3): E.coli derived data file used in the tutorial. Data was obtained from the Galaxy Training Network and pre-processed using Galaxy Australia. Blastp_vs_swissprot.gff3: E.coli derived data file used in the tutorial. Data was obtained from the Galaxy Training Network and pre-processed using Galaxy Australia. Materials shared elsewhere: This workshop is based on the tutorial ‘Refining genome annotations with Apollo’ which was developed for the Galaxy Training Network. Anthony Bretaudeau, Helena Rasche, Nathan Dunn, Mateo Boudet, Erasmus Programme, 2021 Refining Genome Annotations with Apollo (Galaxy Training Materials). https://training.galaxyproject.org/training-material/topics/genome-annotation/tutorials/apollo/tutorial.html Online; accessed Wed Dec 15 2021 See also: Batut et al., 2018 Community-Driven Data Analysis Training for Biology Cell Systems 10.1016/j.cels.2018.05.012 Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Apollo Software, Bioinformatics, Analysis, Workflows, Genomics, Genome annotation
WORKSHOP: Hybrid de novo genome assembly

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Hybrid de novo genome assembly’. This workshop took place on 7 October 2021.

Workshop description

It’s now easier than ever to assemble new reference genomes thanks to hybrid genome assembly approaches...

Keywords: Galaxy Australia, Bioinformatics, Analysis, Workflows, Genomics, Genome assembly, De novo assembly

WORKSHOP: Hybrid de novo genome assembly https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-hybrid-de-novo-genome-assembly-714004ba-0348-47c8-a68f-038a1f8ccfb1 This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Hybrid de novo genome assembly’. This workshop took place on 7 October 2021. Workshop description It’s now easier than ever to assemble new reference genomes thanks to hybrid genome assembly approaches which enable research on organisms for which reference genomes were not previously available. These approaches combine the strengths of short (Illumina) and long (PacBio or Nanopore) read technologies, resulting in improved assembly quality. In this workshop we will learn how to create and assess genome assemblies from Illumina and Nanopore reads using data from a Bacillus Subtilis strain. We will demonstrate two hybrid-assembly methods using the tools Flye, Pilon, and Unicycler to perform assembly and subsequent error correction. You will learn how to visualise input read sets and the assemblies produced at each stage and assess the quality of the final assembly. All analyses will be performed using Galaxy Australia, an online platform for biological research that allows people to use computational data analysis tools and workflows without the need for programming experience. This workshop is presented by the Australian BioCommons and Melbourne Bioinformatics with the assistance of a network of facilitators from the national Bioinformatics Training Cooperative. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Schedule (PDF): A breakdown of the topics and timings for the workshop   Materials shared elsewhere: This workshop follows the tutorial ‘Hybrid genome assembly - Nanopore and Illumina’ developed by Melbourne Bioinformatics. https://www.melbournebioinformatics.org.au/tutorials/tutorials/hybrid_assembly/nanopore_assembly/ Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Galaxy Australia, Bioinformatics, Analysis, Workflows, Genomics, Genome assembly, De novo assembly
Accelerating skills development in Data science and AI at scale

At the Monash Data Science and AI  platform, we believe that upskilling our research community and building a workforce with data science skills are key to accelerating the application of data science in research. To achieve this, we create and leverage new and existing training capabilities...

Keywords: AI, machine learning, eresearch skills, training, train the trainer, volunteer instructors, training partnerships, training material

Accelerating skills development in Data science and AI at scale https://dresa.org.au/materials/accelerating-skills-development-in-data-science-and-ai-at-scale-2d8a65fa-f96e-44ad-a026-cfae3f38d128 At the Monash Data Science and AI  platform, we believe that upskilling our research community and building a workforce with data science skills are key to accelerating the application of data science in research. To achieve this, we create and leverage new and existing training capabilities within and outside Monash University. In this talk, we will discuss the principles and purpose of establishing collaborative models to accelerate skills development at scale. We will talk about our approach to identifying gaps in the existing skills and training available in data science, key areas of interest as identified by the research community and various sources of training available in the marketplace. We will provide insights into the collaborations we currently have and intend to develop in the future within the university and also nationally. The talk will also cover our approach as outlined below •        Combined survey of gaps in skills and trainings for Data science and AI •        Provide seats to partners •        Share associate instructors/helpers/volunteers •        Develop combined training materials •        Publish a repository of open source trainings •        Train the trainer activities •        Establish a network of volunteers to deliver trainings at their local regions Industry plays a significant role in making some invaluable training available to the research community either through self learning platforms like AWS Machine Learning University or Instructor led courses like NVIDIA Deep Learning Institute. We will discuss how we leverage our partnerships with Industry to bring these trainings to our research community. Finally, we will discuss how we map our training to the ARDC skills roadmap and how the ARDC platforms project “Environments to accelerate Machine Learning based Discovery” has enabled collaboration between Monash University and University of Queensland to develop and deliver training together. contact@ardc.edu.au AI, machine learning, eresearch skills, training, train the trainer, volunteer instructors, training partnerships, training material
Monash University - University of Queensland training partnership in Data science and AI

We describe the peer network exchange for training that has been recently created via an ARDC funded partnership between Monash University and Universities of Queensland under the umbrella of the Queensland Cyber Infrastructure Foundation (QCIF). As part of a training program in machine learning,...

Keywords: data skills, training partnerships, data science, AI, training material

Monash University - University of Queensland training partnership in Data science and AI https://dresa.org.au/materials/monash-university-university-of-queensland-training-partnership-in-data-science-and-ai-8082bf73-d20f-4214-ad8c-95123e25a36c We describe the peer network exchange for training that has been recently created via an ARDC funded partnership between Monash University and Universities of Queensland under the umbrella of the Queensland Cyber Infrastructure Foundation (QCIF). As part of a training program in machine learning, visualisation, and computing tools, we have established a series of over 20 workshops over the year where either Monash or QCIF hosts the event for some 20-40 of their researchers and students, while some 5 places are offered to participants from the other institution. In the longer term we aim to share material developed at one institution and have trainers present it at the other. In this talk we will describe the many benefits we have found to this approach including access to a wider range of expertise in several rapidly developing fields, upskilling of trainers, faster identification of emerging training needs, and peer learning for trainers. contact@ardc.edu.au data skills, training partnerships, data science, AI, training material
WORKSHOP: Translating workflows into Nextflow with Janis

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Translating workflows into Nextflow with Janis’. This workshop took place online on 19 June 2023.

Event description

Bioinformatics workflows are critical for reproducibly transferring methodologies...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, CWL, Galaxy

WORKSHOP: Translating workflows into Nextflow with Janis https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-translating-workflows-into-nextflow-with-janis This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Translating workflows into Nextflow with Janis’. This workshop took place online on 19 June 2023. Event description Bioinformatics workflows are critical for reproducibly transferring methodologies between research groups and for scaling between computational infrastructures. Research groups currently invest a lot of time and effort in creating and updating workflows; the ability to translate from one workflow language into another can make them easier to share, and maintain with minimal effort. For example, research groups that would like to run an existing Galaxy workflow on HPC, or extend it for their use, might find translating the workflow to Nextflow more suitable for their ongoing use-cases.  Janis is a framework that provides an abstraction layer for describing workflows, and a tool that can translate workflows between existing languages such as CWL, WDL, Galaxy and Nextflow. Janis aims to translate as much as it can, leaving the user to validate the workflow and make small manual adjustments where direct translations are not possible. Originating from the Portable Pipelines Project between Melbourne Bioinformatics, the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, this tool is now available for everyone to use. This workshop provides an introduction to Janis and how it can be used to translate Galaxy and CWL based tools and workflows into Nextflow. Using hands-on examples we’ll step you through the process and demonstrate how to optimise, troubleshoot and test the translated workflows. This workshop event and accompanying materials were developed by the Melbourne Bioinformatics and the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre. The workshop was enabled through the Australian BioCommons - Bring Your Own Data Platforms project funded by the Australian Research Data Commons and NCRIS via Bioplatforms Australia.    Materials Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Intro to Galaxy (PDF): Slides presented during the workshop Intro to CWL (PDF): Slides presented during the workshop Intro to the session & Janis (PDF): Slides presented during the workshop Janis_Schedule (PDF): Schedule for the workshop providing a breakdown of topics and timings Materials shared elsewhere: This workshop follows the accompanying training materials: https://www.melbournebioinformatics.org.au/tutorials/tutorials/janis_translate/janis_translate   A recording of the workshop is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube channel: https://youtu.be/0IiY1GEx_BY Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, CWL, Galaxy
WORKSHOP: Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research’. This workshop took place over two, 3 hour sessions on 18-19 May 2023.

Event description

Processing and analysing omics datasets poses many...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-core

WORKSHOP: Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-unlocking-nf-core-customising-workflows-for-your-research This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research’. This workshop took place over two, 3 hour sessions on 18-19 May 2023. Event description Processing and analysing omics datasets poses many challenges to life scientists, particularly when we need to share our methods with other researchers and scale up our research. Public and reproducible bioinformatics workflows, like those developed by nf-core, are invaluable resources for the life science community. nf-core is a community-driven effort to provide high-quality bioinformatics workflows for common analyses including, RNAseq, mapping, variant calling, and single cell transcriptomics. A big advantage of using nf-core workflows is the ability to customise and optimise them for different computational environments, types and sizes of data and research goals.  This workshop will set you up with the foundational knowledge required to run and customise nf-core workflows in a reproducible manner. On day 1 you will learn about the nf-core tools utility, and step through the code structure of nf-core workflows. Then on day 2, using the nf-core/rnaseq workflow as an example, you will explore the various ways to adjust the workflow parameters, customise processes, and configure the workflow for your computational environment. This workshop event and accompanying materials were developed by the Sydney Informatics Hub, University of Sydney in partnership with Seqera Labs, Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre, and Australia’s National Research Education Network (AARNet). The workshop was enabled through the Australian BioCommons - Bring Your Own Data Platforms project (Australian Research Data Commons and NCRIS via Bioplatforms Australia).  Materials Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. nfcore_Schedule: Schedule for the workshop providing a breakdown of topics and timings nfcore_Q_and_A: Archive of questions and their answers from the workshop Slack Channel. Materials shared elsewhere: This workshop follows the accompanying training materials that were developed by the Sydney Informatics Hub, University of Sydney in partnership with Seqera Labs, Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre, and Australia’s National Research Education Network (AARNet).  https://sydney-informatics-hub.github.io/customising-nfcore-workshop Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-core
WEBINAR: Pro tips for scaling bioinformatics workflows to HPC

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Pro tips for scaling bioinformatics workflows to HPC’. This webinar took place on 31 May 2023.

Event description 

High Performance Computing (HPC) infrastructures offer the computational scale and...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, HPC, High Performance Computing

WEBINAR: Pro tips for scaling bioinformatics workflows to HPC https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-pro-tips-for-scaling-bioinformatics-workflows-to-hpc This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Pro tips for scaling bioinformatics workflows to HPC’. This webinar took place on 31 May 2023. Event description  High Performance Computing (HPC) infrastructures offer the computational scale and efficiency that life scientists need to handle complex biological datasets and multi-step computational workflows. But scaling workflows to HPC from smaller, more familiar computational infrastructures brings with it new jargon, expectations, and processes to learn. To make the most of HPC resources, bioinformatics workflows need to be designed for distributed computing environments and carefully manage varying resource requirements, and data scale related to biology.   In this webinar, Dr Georgina Samaha from the Sydney Informatics Hub, Dr Matthew Downton from the National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) and Dr Sarah Beecroft from the Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre help you navigate the world of HPC for running and developing bioinformatics workflows. They explain when you should take your workflows to HPC and highlight the architectural features you should make the most of to scale your analyses once you’re there. You’ll hear pro-tips for dealing with common pain points like software installation, optimising for parallel computing and resource management, and will find out how to get access to Australia’s National HPC infrastructures at NCI and Pawsey.  Materials Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Pro-tips_HPC_Slides: A PDF copy of the slides presented during the webinar. Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/YKJDRXCmGMo Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, HPC, High Performance Computing
WEBINAR: AlphaFold: what's in it for me?

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘WEBINAR: AlphaFold: what’s in it for me?’. This webinar took place on 18 April 2023.

Event description 

AlphaFold has taken the scientific world by storm with the ability to accurately predict the...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Machine Learning, Structural Biology, Proteins, Drug discovery, AlphaFold, AI, Artificial Intelligence, Deep learning

WEBINAR: AlphaFold: what's in it for me? https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-alphafold-what-s-in-it-for-me This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘WEBINAR: AlphaFold: what’s in it for me?’. This webinar took place on 18 April 2023. Event description  AlphaFold has taken the scientific world by storm with the ability to accurately predict the structure of any protein in minutes using artificial intelligence (AI). From drug discovery to enzymes that degrade plastics, this promises to speed up and fundamentally change the way that protein structures are used in biological research.  Beyond the hype, what does this mean for structural biology as a field (and as a career)? Dr Craig Morton, Drug Discovery Lead at the CSIRO, is an early adopter of AlphaFold and has decades of expertise in protein structure / function, protein modelling, protein – ligand interactions and computational small molecule drug discovery, with particular interest in anti-infective agents for the treatment of bacterial and viral diseases. Craig joins this webinar to share his perspective on the implications of AlphaFold for science and structural biology. He will give an overview of how AlphaFold works, ways to access AlphaFold, and some examples of how it can be used for protein structure/function analysis. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/4ytn2_AiH8s Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Machine Learning, Structural Biology, Proteins, Drug discovery, AlphaFold, AI, Artificial Intelligence, Deep learning
WORKSHOP: Make your bioinformatics workflows findable and citable

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Make your bioinformatics workflows findable and citable’. This workshop took place on 21 March 2023.

Event description

Computational workflows are invaluable resources for research communities. They help...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, WorkflowHub, FAIR, Open Science

WORKSHOP: Make your bioinformatics workflows findable and citable https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-make-your-bioinformatics-workflows-findable-and-citable This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Make your bioinformatics workflows findable and citable’. This workshop took place on 21 March 2023. Event description Computational workflows are invaluable resources for research communities. They help us  standardise common analyses, collaborate with other researchers, and support reproducibility. Bioinformatics workflow developers invest significant time and expertise to create, share, and maintain these resources for the benefit of the wider community and being able to easily find and access workflows is an essential factor in their uptake by the community. Increasingly, the research community is turning to workflow registries to find and access public workflows that can be applied to their research. Workflow registries support workflow findability and citation by providing a central repository and allowing users to search for and discover them easily. This workshop will introduce you to workflow registries and support attendees to register their workflows on the popular workflow registry, WorkflowHub. We’ll kick off the workshop with an introduction to the concepts underlying workflow findability, how it can benefit workflow developers, and how you can make the most of workflow registries to share your computational workflows with the research community. You will then have the opportunity to register your own workflows in WorkflowHub with support from our trainers.  Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. 2023-03-21_Workflows_slides (PDF): A copy of the slides presented during the workshop Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of the first part of this workshop is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/2kGKxaPuQN8 Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, WorkflowHub, FAIR, Open Science
WORKSHOP: RNA-Seq: reads to differential genes and pathways

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘RNA-Seq: reads to differential genes and pathways’. This workshop took place over two, 3.5 hour sessions on 27 and 28 September 2022.

Event description

RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is a common method...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Analysis, Transcriptomics, RNA-seq, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-co.re

WORKSHOP: RNA-Seq: reads to differential genes and pathways https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-rna-seq-reads-to-differential-genes-and-pathways This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘RNA-Seq: reads to differential genes and pathways’. This workshop took place over two, 3.5 hour sessions on 27 and 28 September 2022. **Event description** RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is a common method used to understand the differences in gene expression and molecular pathways between two or more groups. This workshop introduces the fundamental concepts of RNA sequencing experiments and will allow you to try out the analysis using data from a study of Williams-Beuren Syndrome, a rare disease.  In the first part of the workshop you will learn how to convert sequence reads into analysis ready count data. To do this we will use nf-core/rnaseq - a portable, scalable, reproducible and publicly available workflow on Pawsey Nimbus Cloud. In the second part of the workshop you will use the count data you created to identify differential genes and pathways using R/Rstudio. By the end of the workshop, you should be able to perform your own RNA-seq analysis for differential gene expression and pathway analysis! This workshop is presented by the Australian BioCommons and Sydney Informatics Hub with the assistance of a network of facilitators from the national Bioinformatics Training Cooperative. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** * Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. * Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. * RNAseq reads to differential genes and pathways - Additional Resources (PDF): Additional resources compiled by the Sydney Informatics Hub * rnaseq_DE_analysis_Day2.html: HTML version of code used on day 2 of the workshop * rnaseq_DE_analysis_Day2.Rmd: R Markdown version of code used on day 2 of the workshop * RNAseq reads to differential genes and pathways_Q_and_A (PDF): Archive of questions and their answers from the workshop Slack Channel. **Materials shared elsewhere:** This workshop follows the tutorial ‘RNA-seq: reads to differential gene expression workshop series’ developed by the Sydney Informatics Hub. https://sydney-informatics-hub.github.io/training.RNAseq.series-quarto/ Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Analysis, Transcriptomics, RNA-seq, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-co.re
WEBINAR: Here's one we prepared earlier: (re)creating bioinformatics methods and workflows with Galaxy Australia

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Here’s one we prepared earlier: (re)creating bioinformatics methods and workflows with Galaxy Australia’. This webinar took place on 26 October 2022.

Event description 

Have you discovered a...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, FAIR, Galaxy Australia

WEBINAR: Here's one we prepared earlier: (re)creating bioinformatics methods and workflows with Galaxy Australia https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-here-s-one-we-prepared-earlier-re-creating-bioinformatics-methods-and-workflows-with-galaxy-australia This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Here’s one we prepared earlier: (re)creating bioinformatics methods and workflows with Galaxy Australia’. This webinar took place on 26 October 2022. **Event description**  Have you discovered a brilliant bioinformatics workflow but you’re not quite sure how to use it? In this webinar we will introduce the power of Galaxy for construction and (re)use of reproducible workflows, whether building workflows from scratch, recreating them from published descriptions and/or extracting from Galaxy histories. Using an established bioinformatics method, we’ll show you how to: * Use the workflows creator in Galaxy Australia  * Build a workflow based on a published method * Annotate workflows so that you (and others) can understand them  * Make workflows finable and citable (important and very easy to do!) Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** * Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. * Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. * GalaxyWorkflows_Slides (PDF): A PDF copy of the slides presented during the webinar. **Materials shared elsewhere:** A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/IMkl6p7hkho Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, FAIR, Galaxy Australia
WEBINAR: Portable, reproducible and scalable bioinformatics workflows using Nextflow and Pawsey Nimbus Cloud

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Portable, reproducible and scalable bioinformatics workflows using Nextflow and Pawsey Nimbus Cloud’. This webinar took place on 20 September 2022.

Event description 

Bioinformatics workflows can...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, Containerisation

WEBINAR: Portable, reproducible and scalable bioinformatics workflows using Nextflow and Pawsey Nimbus Cloud https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-portable-reproducible-and-scalable-bioinformatics-workflows-using-nextflow-and-pawsey-nimbus-cloud This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Portable, reproducible and scalable bioinformatics workflows using Nextflow and Pawsey Nimbus Cloud’. This webinar took place on 20 September 2022. **Event description**  Bioinformatics workflows can support portable, reproducible and scalable analysis of omics datasets but using workflows can be challenging for both beginners and experienced bioinformaticians. Beginners face a steep learning curve to be able to build and deploy their own bioinformatics workflows while those with more experience face challenges productionising and scaling code for custom workflows and big data.  Bioinformaticians across the world are using Nextflow to build and manage workflows. Many of these workflows are shared for others to use and supported by the community via nf-co.re. So far, 39 workflows for omics data are available with another 23 under development. These workflows cover common analyses such as RNAseq, mapping, variant calling, single cell transcriptomics and more and can be easily deployed by anyone, regardless of skill level. In this webinar, Nandan Deshpande from the Sydney Informatics Hub, University of Sydney, will discuss how you can deploy freely available Nextflow (nf.co-re) bioinformatics workflows with a single command. We describe how you can quickly get started deploying these workflows using Pawsey Nimbus Cloud. For advanced users, we introduce you to Nextflow concepts to get you started with building your own workflows that will save you time and support reproducible, portable and scalable analysis. In the latter half of the webinar, Sarah Beecroft from the Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre will talk about their Nimbus Cloud systems. While Nextflow supports portability and can run on many computing infrastructures, we describe why we specifically love using Nimbus with Nextflow for many bioinformatics projects. We will describe some of the nf.co-re workflows that we have used on Nimbus and the research outcomes. We will also cover when not to use Nimbus and the alternatives we recommend.   Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: * Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. * Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. * Nextflow_Nimbus_slides (PDF): A PDF copy of the slides presented during the webinar. Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/VnLX63yXbJU Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, Containerisation
WEBINAR: Getting started with whole genome mapping and variant calling on the command line

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Getting started with whole genome mapping and variant calling on the command line’. This webinar took place on 24 August 2022.

Event description 

Life scientists are increasingly using whole...

Keywords: Genome mapping, Variant calling, Bioinformatics, Workflows

WEBINAR: Getting started with whole genome mapping and variant calling on the command line https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-getting-started-with-whole-genome-mapping-and-variant-calling-on-the-command-line This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Getting started with whole genome mapping and variant calling on the command line’. This webinar took place on 24 August 2022. **Event description**  Life scientists are increasingly using whole genome sequencing (WGS) to ask and answer research questions across the tree of life. Before any of this work can be done, there is the essential but challenging task of processing raw sequencing data. Processing WGS data is a computationally challenging, multi-step process used to create a map of an individual’s genome and identify genetic variant sites. The tools you use in this process and overall workflow design can look very different for different researchers, it all depends on your dataset and the research questions you’re asking. Luckily, there are lots of existing WGS processing tools and pipelines out there, but knowing where to start and what your specific needs are is hard work, no matter how experienced you are.  In this webinar we will walk through the essential steps and considerations for researchers who are running and building reproducible WGS mapping and variant calling pipelines at the command line interface. We will discuss how to choose and evaluate a pipeline that is right for your dataset and research questions, and how to get access to the compute resources you need Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: * Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. * Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. * WGS mapping and variant calling _slides (PDF): A PDF copy of the slides presented during the webinar. Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/Q2EceFyizio Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Genome mapping, Variant calling, Bioinformatics, Workflows
WEBINAR: bio.tools - making it easier to find, understand and cite biological tools and software

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘bio.tools - making it easier to find, understand and cite biological tools and software’. This webinar took place on 21 June 2022.

Event description

bio.tools provides easy access to essential...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Research software, EDAM, Workflows, FAIR

WEBINAR: bio.tools - making it easier to find, understand and cite biological tools and software https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-bio-tools-making-it-easier-to-find-understand-and-cite-biological-tools-and-software-9180e32a-f4f5-4993-a90a-a9bfcfafd4f3 This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘bio.tools - making it easier to find, understand and cite biological tools and software’. This webinar took place on 21 June 2022. **Event description** bio.tools provides easy access to essential scientific and technical information about software, command-line tools, databases and services. It’s backed by ELIXIR, the European Infrastructure for Biological Information, and is being used in Australia to register software (e.g. Galaxy Australia, prokka). It underpins the information provided in the Australian BioCommons discovery service ToolFinder. Hans Ienasescu and Matúš Kalaš join us to explain how bio.tools uses a community driven, open science model to create this collection of resources and how it makes it easier to find, understand, utilise and cite them. They’ll delve into how bio.tools is using standard semantics (e.g. the EDAM ontology) and syntax (e.g. biotoolsSchema) to enrich the annotation and description of tools and resources. Finally, we’ll see how the community can contribute to bio.tools and take advantage of its key features to share and promote their own research software.   Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: * Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. * Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. * biotools_EDAM_slides (PDF): A PDF copy of the slides presented during the webinar. Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/K0J4_bAUG3Y Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Research software, EDAM, Workflows, FAIR
WEBINAR: bio.tools - making it easier to find, understand and cite biological tools and software

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘bio.tools - making it easier to find, understand and cite biological tools and software’. This webinar took place on 21 June 2022.

Event description

bio.tools provides easy access to essential...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Research software, EDAM, Workflows, FAIR

WEBINAR: bio.tools - making it easier to find, understand and cite biological tools and software https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-bio-tools-making-it-easier-to-find-understand-and-cite-biological-tools-and-software This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘bio.tools - making it easier to find, understand and cite biological tools and software’. This webinar took place on 21 June 2022. **Event description** bio.tools provides easy access to essential scientific and technical information about software, command-line tools, databases and services. It’s backed by ELIXIR, the European Infrastructure for Biological Information, and is being used in Australia to register software (e.g. Galaxy Australia, prokka). It underpins the information provided in the Australian BioCommons discovery service ToolFinder. Hans Ienasescu and Matúš Kalaš join us to explain how bio.tools uses a community driven, open science model to create this collection of resources and how it makes it easier to find, understand, utilise and cite them. They’ll delve into how bio.tools is using standard semantics (e.g. the EDAM ontology) and syntax (e.g. biotoolsSchema) to enrich the annotation and description of tools and resources. Finally, we’ll see how the community can contribute to bio.tools and take advantage of its key features to share and promote their own research software.   Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - biotools_EDAM_slides (PDF): A PDF copy of the slides presented during the webinar. **Materials shared elsewhere:** A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/K0J4_bAUG3Y Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Research software, EDAM, Workflows, FAIR