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Authors: Dow, Ellen (orcid: 0000-000...  or Samaha, Georgina (orcid: 00... 


WEBINAR: KBase - A knowledge base for systems biology

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘KBase - A knowledge base for systems biology’. This webinar took place on 22 September 2021.

Event description 

Developed for bench biologists and bioinformaticians, The Department of Energy Systems...

Keywords: Systems Biology, FAIR Research, Open Source Software, Metagenomics, Microbiology

WEBINAR: KBase - A knowledge base for systems biology https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-kbase-a-knowledge-base-for-systems-biology-653d9753-989d-4194-9230-6e2d90652955 This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘KBase - A knowledge base for systems biology’. This webinar took place on 22 September 2021. Event description  Developed for bench biologists and bioinformaticians, The Department of Energy Systems Biology Knowledgebase (KBase) is a free, open source, software and data science platform designed to meet the grand challenge of systems biology: predicting and designing biological function. This webinar will provide an overview of the KBase mission and user community, as well as a tour of the online platform and basic functionality. You’ll learn how KBase can support your research: Upload data, run analysis tools (Apps), share your analysis with collaborators, and publish your data and reproducible workflows. We’ll highlight a brand new feature that enables users to link environment and measurement data to sequencing data. You’ll also find out how KBase supports findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable (FAIR) research by providing open, reproducible, shareable bioinformatics workflows. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Q&A for Australian BioCommons KBase Webinar [PDF]: Document containing answers to questions asked during the webinar and links to additional resources Introduction to KBase: Australian BioCommons Webinar [PDF]: Slides presented during the webinar Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of the webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/tJ94i9gOJfU The slides are also available as Google slides:  https://tinyurl.com/KBase-webinar-slides Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Systems Biology, FAIR Research, Open Source Software, Metagenomics, Microbiology
WEBINAR: Where to go when your bioinformatics outgrows your compute

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Where to go when your bioinformatics outgrows your compute’. This webinar took place on 19 August 2021.

Bioinformatics analyses are often complex, requiring multiple software tools and specialised compute...

Keywords: Computational Biology, Bioinformatics, High performance computing, HPC, Galaxy Australia, Nectar Research Cloud, Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, NCI, NCMAS, Cloud computing

WEBINAR: Where to go when your bioinformatics outgrows your compute https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-where-to-go-when-your-bioinformatics-outgrows-your-compute-7a5a0ff8-8f4f-4fd0-af20-a88d515a6554 This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Where to go when your bioinformatics outgrows your compute’. This webinar took place on 19 August 2021. Bioinformatics analyses are often complex, requiring multiple software tools and specialised compute resources. “I don’t know what compute resources I will need”, “My analysis won’t run and I don’t know why” and "Just getting it to work" are common pain points for researchers. In this webinar, you will learn how to understand the compute requirements for your bioinformatics workflows. You will also hear about ways of accessing compute that suits your needs as an Australian researcher, including Galaxy Australia, cloud and high-performance computing services offered by the Australian Research Data Commons, the National Compute Infrastructure (NCI) and Pawsey.  We also describe bioinformatics and computing support services available to Australian researchers.  This webinar was jointly organised with the Sydney Informatics Hub at the University of Sydney. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Where to go when your bioinformatics outgrows your compute - slides (PDF and PPTX): Slides presented during the webinar Australian research computing resources cheat sheet (PDF): A list of resources and useful links mentioned during the webinar. Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of the webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/hNTbngSc-W0 Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Computational Biology, Bioinformatics, High performance computing, HPC, Galaxy Australia, Nectar Research Cloud, Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, NCI, NCMAS, Cloud computing
WEBINAR: High performance bioinformatics: submitting your best NCMAS application

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘High performance bioinformatics: submitting your best NCMAS application’. This webinar took place on 20 August 2021.

Bioinformaticians are increasingly turning to specialised compute infrastructure and...

Keywords: Computational Biology, Bioinformatics, High Performance Computing, HPC, NCMAS

WEBINAR: High performance bioinformatics: submitting your best NCMAS application https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-high-performance-bioinformatics-submitting-your-best-ncmas-application-ee80822f-74ac-41af-a5a4-e162c10e6d78 This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘High performance bioinformatics: submitting your best NCMAS application’. This webinar took place on 20 August 2021. Bioinformaticians are increasingly turning to specialised compute infrastructure and efficient, scalable workflows as their research becomes more data intensive. Australian researchers that require extensive compute resources to process large datasets can apply for access to national high performance computing facilities (e.g. Pawsey and NCI) to power their research through the National Computational Merit Allocation Scheme (NCMAS). NCMAS is a competitive, merit-based scheme and requires applicants to carefully consider how the compute infrastructure and workflows will be applied.  This webinar provides life science researchers with insights into what makes a strong NCMAS application, with a focus on the technical assessment, and how to design and present effective and efficient bioinformatic workflows for the various national compute facilities. It will be followed by a short Q&A session. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. High performance bioinformatics: submitting your best NCMAS application - slides (PDF and PPTX): Slides presented during the webinar   Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of the webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/HeFGjguwS0Y Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Computational Biology, Bioinformatics, High Performance Computing, HPC, NCMAS
WORKSHOP: RNASeq: reads to differential genes and pathways

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop 'RNASeq: reads to differential genes and pathways'. This workshop took place over two, 3 hour sessions on 11 and 12 October 2023.Event descriptionRNA sequencing (RNAseq) is a popular and powerful technique...

Keywords: bioinformatics, transcriptomics, RNA-seq, RNAseq

WORKSHOP: RNASeq: reads to differential genes and pathways https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-rnaseq-reads-to-differential-genes-and-pathways This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop 'RNASeq: reads to differential genes and pathways'. This workshop took place over two, 3 hour sessions on 11 and 12 October 2023.Event descriptionRNA sequencing (RNAseq) is a popular and powerful technique used to understand the activity of genes. Using differential gene profiling methods, we can use RNAseq data to gain valuable insights into gene activity and identify variability in gene expression between samples to understand the molecular pathways underpinning many different traits.  In this hands-on workshop, you will learn RNAseq fundamentals as you process, analyse, and interpret the results from a real RNAseq experiment on the command-line. In session one, you will convert raw sequence reads to analysis-ready count data with the nf-core/rnaseq workflow. In session two, you'll work interactively in RStudio to identify differentially expressed genes,perform functional enrichment analysis, and visualise and interpret your results using popular and best practice R packages.  This workshop was delivered as a part of the Australian BioCommons Bring Your Own Data Platforms Project and will provide you with an opportunity to explore services and infrastructure built specifically for life scientists working at the command line. By the end of the workshop, you will be familiar with Pawsey's Nimbus cloud platform and be able to process your own RNAseq datasets and perform differential expression analysis on the command-line. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event.Lead trainers: Dr Georgina Samaha (Sydney Informatics Hub), Dr Nandan Deshpande (Sydney Informatics Hub)Facilitators: Ching-Yu Lu and Jessica Chung.Infrastructure provision: Audrey Stott (Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre), Alex Ip (AARNet)Host: Melissa Burke, Australian BioCommons Training materialsFiles and materials included in this record:Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc.Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file.Materials shared elsewhere:This workshop follows the tutorial 'Introduction to RNAseq workshop: reads to differential gene expression' developed by the Sydney Informatics Hub.https://sydney-informatics-hub.github.io/rnaseq-workshop-2023/Additional supporting materials are available via GitHubRstudio rnaseq container: https://github.com/Sydney-Informatics-Hub/Rstudio-rnaseq-contained/tree/mainRNAseq differential expression R notebook: https://github.com/Sydney-Informatics-Hub/rna-differential-expression-Rnotebook Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) bioinformatics, transcriptomics, RNA-seq, RNAseq
WEBINAR: Getting started with RNAseq: Transforming raw reads into biological insights

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Getting started with RNAseq: Transforming raw reads into biological insights’. This webinar took place on 6 September 2023.

Event description 

RNA sequencing (RNAseq) is a powerful technique for...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Transcriptomics, RNA-seq, RNAseq, Gene expression

WEBINAR: Getting started with RNAseq: Transforming raw reads into biological insights https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-getting-started-with-rnaseq-transforming-raw-reads-into-biological-insights-1f7db385-e282-4332-a1c4-d1d73a769b1b This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Getting started with RNAseq: Transforming raw reads into biological insights’. This webinar took place on 6 September 2023. Event description  RNA sequencing (RNAseq) is a powerful technique for investigating gene expression in biological samples. Processing and analysing RNAseq data involves multiple steps to align raw sequence reads to a reference genome, count the number of reads mapped to each gene, and perform statistical analyses to identify differentially expressed genes and functionally annotate them. RNAseq experiments have many different applications as we apply them to a variety of research questions and organisms. This diversity of applications can make it challenging to appreciate all the design considerations, processing requirements, and limitations of RNAseq experiments as they apply to you. In this webinar, you will gain an understanding of the key considerations for designing and performing your own successful experiments with bulk RNA. We’ll start at the lab bench with RNA extraction, quality control, and library preparation, then move to the sequencing machine where you will make essential decisions about sequencing platforms, optimal sequencing depth, and the importance of replicates. We’ll talk about bioinformatics workflows for RNAseq data processing and the computational requirements of transforming raw sequencing reads to analysis-ready count data. Finally, we’ll discuss how to apply differential expression and functional enrichment analyses to gain biological insights from differentially expressed genes. This webinar was developed by the Sydney Informatics Hub in collaboration with the Australian BioCommons. Training materials Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Getting started with RNAseq: A PDF copy of the slides presented during the webinar. Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/tITR3WR_jWI Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Transcriptomics, RNA-seq, RNAseq, Gene expression
WORKSHOP: Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research’. This workshop took place over two, 3 hour sessions on 18-19 May 2023.

Event description

Processing and analysing omics datasets poses many...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-core

WORKSHOP: Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-unlocking-nf-core-customising-workflows-for-your-research-1584ff39-e007-4422-9fd5-4e407df6b6c5 This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research’. This workshop took place over two, 3 hour sessions on 18-19 May 2023. Event description Processing and analysing omics datasets poses many challenges to life scientists, particularly when we need to share our methods with other researchers and scale up our research. Public and reproducible bioinformatics workflows, like those developed by nf-core, are invaluable resources for the life science community. nf-core is a community-driven effort to provide high-quality bioinformatics workflows for common analyses including, RNAseq, mapping, variant calling, and single cell transcriptomics. A big advantage of using nf-core workflows is the ability to customise and optimise them for different computational environments, types and sizes of data and research goals.  This workshop will set you up with the foundational knowledge required to run and customise nf-core workflows in a reproducible manner. On day 1 you will learn about the nf-core tools utility, and step through the code structure of nf-core workflows. Then on day 2, using the nf-core/rnaseq workflow as an example, you will explore the various ways to adjust the workflow parameters, customise processes, and configure the workflow for your computational environment. This workshop event and accompanying materials were developed by the Sydney Informatics Hub, University of Sydney in partnership with Seqera Labs, Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre, and Australia’s National Research Education Network (AARNet). The workshop was enabled through the Australian BioCommons - Bring Your Own Data Platforms project (Australian Research Data Commons and NCRIS via Bioplatforms Australia).  Materials Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. nfcore_Schedule: Schedule for the workshop providing a breakdown of topics and timings nfcore_Q_and_A: Archive of questions and their answers from the workshop Slack Channel. Materials shared elsewhere: This workshop follows the accompanying training materials that were developed by the Sydney Informatics Hub, University of Sydney in partnership with Seqera Labs, Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre, and Australia’s National Research Education Network (AARNet).  https://sydney-informatics-hub.github.io/customising-nfcore-workshop Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-core
WEBINAR: Pro tips for scaling bioinformatics workflows to HPC

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Pro tips for scaling bioinformatics workflows to HPC’. This webinar took place on 31 May 2023.

Event description 

High Performance Computing (HPC) infrastructures offer the computational scale and...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, HPC, High Performance Computing

WEBINAR: Pro tips for scaling bioinformatics workflows to HPC https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-pro-tips-for-scaling-bioinformatics-workflows-to-hpc-9f2a8b90-88da-433b-83b2-b1ab262dd9df This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Pro tips for scaling bioinformatics workflows to HPC’. This webinar took place on 31 May 2023. Event description  High Performance Computing (HPC) infrastructures offer the computational scale and efficiency that life scientists need to handle complex biological datasets and multi-step computational workflows. But scaling workflows to HPC from smaller, more familiar computational infrastructures brings with it new jargon, expectations, and processes to learn. To make the most of HPC resources, bioinformatics workflows need to be designed for distributed computing environments and carefully manage varying resource requirements, and data scale related to biology.   In this webinar, Dr Georgina Samaha from the Sydney Informatics Hub, Dr Matthew Downton from the National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) and Dr Sarah Beecroft from the Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre help you navigate the world of HPC for running and developing bioinformatics workflows. They explain when you should take your workflows to HPC and highlight the architectural features you should make the most of to scale your analyses once you’re there. You’ll hear pro-tips for dealing with common pain points like software installation, optimising for parallel computing and resource management, and will find out how to get access to Australia’s National HPC infrastructures at NCI and Pawsey.  Materials Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Pro-tips_HPC_Slides: A PDF copy of the slides presented during the webinar. Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/YKJDRXCmGMo Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, HPC, High Performance Computing
WORKSHOP: Make your bioinformatics workflows findable and citable

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Make your bioinformatics workflows findable and citable’. This workshop took place on 21 March 2023.

Event description

Computational workflows are invaluable resources for research communities. They help...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, WorkflowHub, FAIR, Open Science

WORKSHOP: Make your bioinformatics workflows findable and citable https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-make-your-bioinformatics-workflows-findable-and-citable-74e85d1c-d869-429e-b942-8391f4bab23d This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Make your bioinformatics workflows findable and citable’. This workshop took place on 21 March 2023. Event description Computational workflows are invaluable resources for research communities. They help us  standardise common analyses, collaborate with other researchers, and support reproducibility. Bioinformatics workflow developers invest significant time and expertise to create, share, and maintain these resources for the benefit of the wider community and being able to easily find and access workflows is an essential factor in their uptake by the community. Increasingly, the research community is turning to workflow registries to find and access public workflows that can be applied to their research. Workflow registries support workflow findability and citation by providing a central repository and allowing users to search for and discover them easily. This workshop will introduce you to workflow registries and support attendees to register their workflows on the popular workflow registry, WorkflowHub. We’ll kick off the workshop with an introduction to the concepts underlying workflow findability, how it can benefit workflow developers, and how you can make the most of workflow registries to share your computational workflows with the research community. You will then have the opportunity to register your own workflows in WorkflowHub with support from our trainers.  Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. 2023-03-21_Workflows_slides (PDF): A copy of the slides presented during the workshop Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of the first part of this workshop is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/2kGKxaPuQN8 Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, WorkflowHub, FAIR, Open Science
WORKSHOP: RNA-Seq: reads to differential genes and pathways

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘RNA-Seq: reads to differential genes and pathways’. This workshop took place over two, 3.5 hour sessions on 27 and 28 September 2022.

Event description

RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is a common method used to...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Analysis, Transcriptomics, RNA-seq, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-co.re

WORKSHOP: RNA-Seq: reads to differential genes and pathways https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-rna-seq-reads-to-differential-genes-and-pathways-5a384156-d3de-4d5d-9797-e689bf6592f8 This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘RNA-Seq: reads to differential genes and pathways’. This workshop took place over two, 3.5 hour sessions on 27 and 28 September 2022. Event description RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is a common method used to understand the differences in gene expression and molecular pathways between two or more groups. This workshop introduces the fundamental concepts of RNA sequencing experiments and will allow you to try out the analysis using data from a study of Williams-Beuren Syndrome, a rare disease.  In the first part of the workshop you will learn how to convert sequence reads into analysis ready count data. To do this we will use nf-core/rnaseq - a portable, scalable, reproducible and publicly available workflow on Pawsey Nimbus Cloud. In the second part of the workshop you will use the count data you created to identify differential genes and pathways using R/Rstudio. By the end of the workshop, you should be able to perform your own RNA-seq analysis for differential gene expression and pathway analysis! This workshop is presented by the Australian BioCommons and Sydney Informatics Hub with the assistance of a network of facilitators from the national Bioinformatics Training Cooperative. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. RNAseq reads to differential genes and pathways - Additional Resources (PDF): Additional resources compiled by the Sydney Informatics Hub rnaseq_DE_analysis_Day2.html: HTML version of code used on day 2 of the workshop rnaseq_DE_analysis_Day2.Rmd: R Markdown version of code used on day 2 of the workshop RNAseq reads to differential genes and pathways_Q_and_A (PDF): Archive of questions and their answers from the workshop Slack Channel. Materials shared elsewhere: This workshop follows the tutorial ‘RNA-seq: reads to differential gene expression workshop series’ developed by the Sydney Informatics Hub. https://sydney-informatics-hub.github.io/training.RNAseq.series-quarto/ Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Analysis, Transcriptomics, RNA-seq, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-co.re
WEBINAR: Getting started with whole genome mapping and variant calling on the command line

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Getting started with whole genome mapping and variant calling on the command line’. This webinar took place on 24 August 2022.

Event description 

Life scientists are increasingly using whole genome...

Keywords: Genome mapping, Variant calling, Bioinformatics, Workflows

WEBINAR: Getting started with whole genome mapping and variant calling on the command line https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-getting-started-with-whole-genome-mapping-and-variant-calling-on-the-command-line-2046f36b-0c7a-4523-9c21-08046900d3ff This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Getting started with whole genome mapping and variant calling on the command line’. This webinar took place on 24 August 2022. Event description  Life scientists are increasingly using whole genome sequencing (WGS) to ask and answer research questions across the tree of life. Before any of this work can be done, there is the essential but challenging task of processing raw sequencing data. Processing WGS data is a computationally challenging, multi-step process used to create a map of an individual’s genome and identify genetic variant sites. The tools you use in this process and overall workflow design can look very different for different researchers, it all depends on your dataset and the research questions you’re asking. Luckily, there are lots of existing WGS processing tools and pipelines out there, but knowing where to start and what your specific needs are is hard work, no matter how experienced you are.  In this webinar we will walk through the essential steps and considerations for researchers who are running and building reproducible WGS mapping and variant calling pipelines at the command line interface. We will discuss how to choose and evaluate a pipeline that is right for your dataset and research questions, and how to get access to the compute resources you need Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. WGS mapping and variant calling _slides (PDF): A PDF copy of the slides presented during the webinar.   Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/Q2EceFyizio Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Genome mapping, Variant calling, Bioinformatics, Workflows
Decoding Bioinformatics: A Primer For Life Scientists

Bioinformatics is a vital component of biological and medical research, supporting data-driven discoveries, genomic medicine, and the development of innovative therapeutics. As the life sciences becomes increasingly data-driven, ‘doing’ bioinformatics to extract, process, analyse, and interpret...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, bioinformatics training, training material

Decoding Bioinformatics: A Primer For Life Scientists https://dresa.org.au/materials/decoding-bioinformatics-a-primer-for-life-scientists Bioinformatics is a vital component of biological and medical research, supporting data-driven discoveries, genomic medicine, and the development of innovative therapeutics. As the life sciences becomes increasingly data-driven, ‘doing’ bioinformatics to extract, process, analyse, and interpret this data has become an essential skill for molecular life scientists. In this masterclass, we delve into the vast world of bioinformatics, illuminating key concepts and experimental design considerations. We explore common experimental applications and essential but easy to overlook practical considerations like how to access the database, software, and computing resources you need. *The Sydney Informatics Hub is a Core Research Facility at The University of Sydney, enabling excellence in research* [https://sydney.edu.au/informatics-hub](https://sydney.edu.au/informatics-hub) sih.training@sydney.edu.au Bioinformatics, bioinformatics training, training material
WEBINAR: Getting started with RNAseq: Transforming raw reads into biological insights

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Getting started with RNAseq: Transforming raw reads into biological insights’. This webinar took place on 6 September 2023.

Event description 

RNA sequencing (RNAseq) is a powerful technique for...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Transcriptomics, RNA-seq, RNAseq, Gene expression

WEBINAR: Getting started with RNAseq: Transforming raw reads into biological insights https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-getting-started-with-rnaseq-transforming-raw-reads-into-biological-insights This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Getting started with RNAseq: Transforming raw reads into biological insights’. This webinar took place on 6 September 2023. Event description  RNA sequencing (RNAseq) is a powerful technique for investigating gene expression in biological samples. Processing and analysing RNAseq data involves multiple steps to align raw sequence reads to a reference genome, count the number of reads mapped to each gene, and perform statistical analyses to identify differentially expressed genes and functionally annotate them. RNAseq experiments have many different applications as we apply them to a variety of research questions and organisms. This diversity of applications can make it challenging to appreciate all the design considerations, processing requirements, and limitations of RNAseq experiments as they apply to you. In this webinar, you will gain an understanding of the key considerations for designing and performing your own successful experiments with bulk RNA. We’ll start at the lab bench with RNA extraction, quality control, and library preparation, then move to the sequencing machine where you will make essential decisions about sequencing platforms, optimal sequencing depth, and the importance of replicates. We’ll talk about bioinformatics workflows for RNAseq data processing and the computational requirements of transforming raw sequencing reads to analysis-ready count data. Finally, we’ll discuss how to apply differential expression and functional enrichment analyses to gain biological insights from differentially expressed genes. This webinar was developed by the Sydney Informatics Hub in collaboration with the Australian BioCommons. Training materials Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Getting started with RNAseq: A PDF copy of the slides presented during the webinar. Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/tITR3WR_jWI Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Transcriptomics, RNA-seq, RNAseq, Gene expression
WORKSHOP: Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research’. This workshop took place over two, 3 hour sessions on 18-19 May 2023.

Event description

Processing and analysing omics datasets poses many...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-core

WORKSHOP: Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-unlocking-nf-core-customising-workflows-for-your-research This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop Unlocking nf-core - customising workflows for your research’. This workshop took place over two, 3 hour sessions on 18-19 May 2023. Event description Processing and analysing omics datasets poses many challenges to life scientists, particularly when we need to share our methods with other researchers and scale up our research. Public and reproducible bioinformatics workflows, like those developed by nf-core, are invaluable resources for the life science community. nf-core is a community-driven effort to provide high-quality bioinformatics workflows for common analyses including, RNAseq, mapping, variant calling, and single cell transcriptomics. A big advantage of using nf-core workflows is the ability to customise and optimise them for different computational environments, types and sizes of data and research goals.  This workshop will set you up with the foundational knowledge required to run and customise nf-core workflows in a reproducible manner. On day 1 you will learn about the nf-core tools utility, and step through the code structure of nf-core workflows. Then on day 2, using the nf-core/rnaseq workflow as an example, you will explore the various ways to adjust the workflow parameters, customise processes, and configure the workflow for your computational environment. This workshop event and accompanying materials were developed by the Sydney Informatics Hub, University of Sydney in partnership with Seqera Labs, Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre, and Australia’s National Research Education Network (AARNet). The workshop was enabled through the Australian BioCommons - Bring Your Own Data Platforms project (Australian Research Data Commons and NCRIS via Bioplatforms Australia).  Materials Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. nfcore_Schedule: Schedule for the workshop providing a breakdown of topics and timings nfcore_Q_and_A: Archive of questions and their answers from the workshop Slack Channel. Materials shared elsewhere: This workshop follows the accompanying training materials that were developed by the Sydney Informatics Hub, University of Sydney in partnership with Seqera Labs, Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre, and Australia’s National Research Education Network (AARNet).  https://sydney-informatics-hub.github.io/customising-nfcore-workshop Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-core
WEBINAR: Pro tips for scaling bioinformatics workflows to HPC

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Pro tips for scaling bioinformatics workflows to HPC’. This webinar took place on 31 May 2023.

Event description 

High Performance Computing (HPC) infrastructures offer the computational scale and...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, HPC, High Performance Computing

WEBINAR: Pro tips for scaling bioinformatics workflows to HPC https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-pro-tips-for-scaling-bioinformatics-workflows-to-hpc This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Pro tips for scaling bioinformatics workflows to HPC’. This webinar took place on 31 May 2023. Event description  High Performance Computing (HPC) infrastructures offer the computational scale and efficiency that life scientists need to handle complex biological datasets and multi-step computational workflows. But scaling workflows to HPC from smaller, more familiar computational infrastructures brings with it new jargon, expectations, and processes to learn. To make the most of HPC resources, bioinformatics workflows need to be designed for distributed computing environments and carefully manage varying resource requirements, and data scale related to biology.   In this webinar, Dr Georgina Samaha from the Sydney Informatics Hub, Dr Matthew Downton from the National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) and Dr Sarah Beecroft from the Pawsey Supercomputing Research Centre help you navigate the world of HPC for running and developing bioinformatics workflows. They explain when you should take your workflows to HPC and highlight the architectural features you should make the most of to scale your analyses once you’re there. You’ll hear pro-tips for dealing with common pain points like software installation, optimising for parallel computing and resource management, and will find out how to get access to Australia’s National HPC infrastructures at NCI and Pawsey.  Materials Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Pro-tips_HPC_Slides: A PDF copy of the slides presented during the webinar. Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/YKJDRXCmGMo Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, HPC, High Performance Computing
WORKSHOP: Make your bioinformatics workflows findable and citable

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Make your bioinformatics workflows findable and citable’. This workshop took place on 21 March 2023.

Event description

Computational workflows are invaluable resources for research communities. They help...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Workflows, WorkflowHub, FAIR, Open Science

WORKSHOP: Make your bioinformatics workflows findable and citable https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-make-your-bioinformatics-workflows-findable-and-citable This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘Make your bioinformatics workflows findable and citable’. This workshop took place on 21 March 2023. Event description Computational workflows are invaluable resources for research communities. They help us  standardise common analyses, collaborate with other researchers, and support reproducibility. Bioinformatics workflow developers invest significant time and expertise to create, share, and maintain these resources for the benefit of the wider community and being able to easily find and access workflows is an essential factor in their uptake by the community. Increasingly, the research community is turning to workflow registries to find and access public workflows that can be applied to their research. Workflow registries support workflow findability and citation by providing a central repository and allowing users to search for and discover them easily. This workshop will introduce you to workflow registries and support attendees to register their workflows on the popular workflow registry, WorkflowHub. We’ll kick off the workshop with an introduction to the concepts underlying workflow findability, how it can benefit workflow developers, and how you can make the most of workflow registries to share your computational workflows with the research community. You will then have the opportunity to register your own workflows in WorkflowHub with support from our trainers.  Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. 2023-03-21_Workflows_slides (PDF): A copy of the slides presented during the workshop Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of the first part of this workshop is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/2kGKxaPuQN8 Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Workflows, WorkflowHub, FAIR, Open Science
WORKSHOP: RNA-Seq: reads to differential genes and pathways

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘RNA-Seq: reads to differential genes and pathways’. This workshop took place over two, 3.5 hour sessions on 27 and 28 September 2022.

Event description

RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is a common method...

Keywords: Bioinformatics, Analysis, Transcriptomics, RNA-seq, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-co.re

WORKSHOP: RNA-Seq: reads to differential genes and pathways https://dresa.org.au/materials/workshop-rna-seq-reads-to-differential-genes-and-pathways This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons workshop ‘RNA-Seq: reads to differential genes and pathways’. This workshop took place over two, 3.5 hour sessions on 27 and 28 September 2022. **Event description** RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is a common method used to understand the differences in gene expression and molecular pathways between two or more groups. This workshop introduces the fundamental concepts of RNA sequencing experiments and will allow you to try out the analysis using data from a study of Williams-Beuren Syndrome, a rare disease.  In the first part of the workshop you will learn how to convert sequence reads into analysis ready count data. To do this we will use nf-core/rnaseq - a portable, scalable, reproducible and publicly available workflow on Pawsey Nimbus Cloud. In the second part of the workshop you will use the count data you created to identify differential genes and pathways using R/Rstudio. By the end of the workshop, you should be able to perform your own RNA-seq analysis for differential gene expression and pathway analysis! This workshop is presented by the Australian BioCommons and Sydney Informatics Hub with the assistance of a network of facilitators from the national Bioinformatics Training Cooperative. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** * Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. * Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. * RNAseq reads to differential genes and pathways - Additional Resources (PDF): Additional resources compiled by the Sydney Informatics Hub * rnaseq_DE_analysis_Day2.html: HTML version of code used on day 2 of the workshop * rnaseq_DE_analysis_Day2.Rmd: R Markdown version of code used on day 2 of the workshop * RNAseq reads to differential genes and pathways_Q_and_A (PDF): Archive of questions and their answers from the workshop Slack Channel. **Materials shared elsewhere:** This workshop follows the tutorial ‘RNA-seq: reads to differential gene expression workshop series’ developed by the Sydney Informatics Hub. https://sydney-informatics-hub.github.io/training.RNAseq.series-quarto/ Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Bioinformatics, Analysis, Transcriptomics, RNA-seq, Workflows, Nextflow, nf-co.re
WEBINAR: Getting started with whole genome mapping and variant calling on the command line

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Getting started with whole genome mapping and variant calling on the command line’. This webinar took place on 24 August 2022.

Event description 

Life scientists are increasingly using whole...

Keywords: Genome mapping, Variant calling, Bioinformatics, Workflows

WEBINAR: Getting started with whole genome mapping and variant calling on the command line https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-getting-started-with-whole-genome-mapping-and-variant-calling-on-the-command-line This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Getting started with whole genome mapping and variant calling on the command line’. This webinar took place on 24 August 2022. **Event description**  Life scientists are increasingly using whole genome sequencing (WGS) to ask and answer research questions across the tree of life. Before any of this work can be done, there is the essential but challenging task of processing raw sequencing data. Processing WGS data is a computationally challenging, multi-step process used to create a map of an individual’s genome and identify genetic variant sites. The tools you use in this process and overall workflow design can look very different for different researchers, it all depends on your dataset and the research questions you’re asking. Luckily, there are lots of existing WGS processing tools and pipelines out there, but knowing where to start and what your specific needs are is hard work, no matter how experienced you are.  In this webinar we will walk through the essential steps and considerations for researchers who are running and building reproducible WGS mapping and variant calling pipelines at the command line interface. We will discuss how to choose and evaluate a pipeline that is right for your dataset and research questions, and how to get access to the compute resources you need Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: * Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. * Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. * WGS mapping and variant calling _slides (PDF): A PDF copy of the slides presented during the webinar. Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of this webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/Q2EceFyizio Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Genome mapping, Variant calling, Bioinformatics, Workflows
WEBINAR: KBase - A knowledge base for systems biology

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘KBase - A knowledge base for systems biology’. This webinar took place on 22 September 2021.

Event description

Developed for bench biologists and bioinformaticians, The Department of Energy...

Keywords: Systems Biology, FAIR Research, Open Source Software, Metagenomics, Microbiology

WEBINAR: KBase - A knowledge base for systems biology https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-kbase-a-knowledge-base-for-systems-biology This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘KBase - A knowledge base for systems biology’. This webinar took place on 22 September 2021. **Event description** Developed for bench biologists and bioinformaticians, The Department of Energy Systems Biology Knowledgebase (KBase) is a free, open source, software and data science platform designed to meet the grand challenge of systems biology: predicting and designing biological function. This webinar will provide an overview of the KBase mission and user community, as well as a tour of the online platform and basic functionality. You’ll learn how KBase can support your research: Upload data, run analysis tools (Apps), share your analysis with collaborators, and publish your data and reproducible workflows. We’ll highlight a brand new feature that enables users to link environment and measurement data to sequencing data. You’ll also find out how KBase supports findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable (FAIR) research by providing open, reproducible, shareable bioinformatics workflows. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - Q&A for Australian BioCommons KBase Webinar [PDF]: Document containing answers to questions asked during the webinar and links to additional resources - Introduction to KBase: Australian BioCommons Webinar [PDF]: Slides presented during the webinar **Materials shared elsewhere:** A recording of the webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/tJ94i9gOJfU The slides are also available as Google slides:  https://tinyurl.com/KBase-webinar-slides Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Systems Biology, FAIR Research, Open Source Software, Metagenomics, Microbiology
WEBINAR: Where to go when your bioinformatics outgrows your compute

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Where to go when your bioinformatics outgrows your compute’. This webinar took place on 19 August 2021.

Bioinformatics analyses are often complex, requiring multiple software tools and specialised...

Keywords: Computational Biology, Bioinformatics, High performance computing, HPC, Galaxy Australia, Nectar Research Cloud, Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, NCI, NCMAS, Cloud computing

WEBINAR: Where to go when your bioinformatics outgrows your compute https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-where-to-go-when-your-bioinformatics-outgrows-your-compute This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Where to go when your bioinformatics outgrows your compute’. This webinar took place on 19 August 2021. Bioinformatics analyses are often complex, requiring multiple software tools and specialised compute resources. “I don’t know what compute resources I will need”, “My analysis won’t run and I don’t know why” and "Just getting it to work" are common pain points for researchers. In this webinar, you will learn how to understand the compute requirements for your bioinformatics workflows. You will also hear about ways of accessing compute that suits your needs as an Australian researcher, including Galaxy Australia, cloud and high-performance computing services offered by the Australian Research Data Commons, the National Compute Infrastructure (NCI) and Pawsey.  We also describe bioinformatics and computing support services available to Australian researchers.  This webinar was jointly organised with the Sydney Informatics Hub at the University of Sydney. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - Where to go when your bioinformatics outgrows your compute - slides (PDF and PPTX): Slides presented during the webinar - Australian research computing resources cheat sheet (PDF): A list of resources and useful links mentioned during the webinar. **Materials shared elsewhere:** A recording of the webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/hNTbngSc-W0 Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Computational Biology, Bioinformatics, High performance computing, HPC, Galaxy Australia, Nectar Research Cloud, Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, NCI, NCMAS, Cloud computing
WEBINAR: High performance bioinformatics: submitting your best NCMAS application

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘High performance bioinformatics: submitting your best NCMAS application’. This webinar took place on 20 August 2021.

Bioinformaticians are increasingly turning to specialised compute infrastructure and...

Keywords: Computational Biology, Bioinformatics, High Performance Computing, HPC, NCMAS

WEBINAR: High performance bioinformatics: submitting your best NCMAS application https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-high-performance-bioinformatics-submitting-your-best-ncmas-application This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘High performance bioinformatics: submitting your best NCMAS application’. This webinar took place on 20 August 2021. Bioinformaticians are increasingly turning to specialised compute infrastructure and efficient, scalable workflows as their research becomes more data intensive. Australian researchers that require extensive compute resources to process large datasets can apply for access to national high performance computing facilities (e.g. Pawsey and NCI) to power their research through the National Computational Merit Allocation Scheme (NCMAS). NCMAS is a competitive, merit-based scheme and requires applicants to carefully consider how the compute infrastructure and workflows will be applied.  This webinar provides life science researchers with insights into what makes a strong NCMAS application, with a focus on the technical assessment, and how to design and present effective and efficient bioinformatic workflows for the various national compute facilities. It will be followed by a short Q&A session. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - High performance bioinformatics: submitting your best NCMAS application - slides (PDF and PPTX): Slides presented during the webinar **Materials shared elsewhere:** A recording of the webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/HeFGjguwS0Y Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Computational Biology, Bioinformatics, High Performance Computing, HPC, NCMAS