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Authors: Coddington, Paul (orcid: 00...  or Amanda Miotto 


WEBINAR: Where to go when your bioinformatics outgrows your compute

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Where to go when your bioinformatics outgrows your compute’. This webinar took place on 19 August 2021.

Bioinformatics analyses are often complex, requiring multiple software tools and specialised compute...

Keywords: Computational Biology, Bioinformatics, High performance computing, HPC, Galaxy Australia, Nectar Research Cloud, Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, NCI, NCMAS, Cloud computing

WEBINAR: Where to go when your bioinformatics outgrows your compute https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-where-to-go-when-your-bioinformatics-outgrows-your-compute-7a5a0ff8-8f4f-4fd0-af20-a88d515a6554 This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Where to go when your bioinformatics outgrows your compute’. This webinar took place on 19 August 2021. Bioinformatics analyses are often complex, requiring multiple software tools and specialised compute resources. “I don’t know what compute resources I will need”, “My analysis won’t run and I don’t know why” and "Just getting it to work" are common pain points for researchers. In this webinar, you will learn how to understand the compute requirements for your bioinformatics workflows. You will also hear about ways of accessing compute that suits your needs as an Australian researcher, including Galaxy Australia, cloud and high-performance computing services offered by the Australian Research Data Commons, the National Compute Infrastructure (NCI) and Pawsey.  We also describe bioinformatics and computing support services available to Australian researchers.  This webinar was jointly organised with the Sydney Informatics Hub at the University of Sydney. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. Files and materials included in this record: Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. Where to go when your bioinformatics outgrows your compute - slides (PDF and PPTX): Slides presented during the webinar Australian research computing resources cheat sheet (PDF): A list of resources and useful links mentioned during the webinar. Materials shared elsewhere: A recording of the webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/hNTbngSc-W0 Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Computational Biology, Bioinformatics, High performance computing, HPC, Galaxy Australia, Nectar Research Cloud, Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, NCI, NCMAS, Cloud computing
WEBINAR: Where to go when your bioinformatics outgrows your compute

This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Where to go when your bioinformatics outgrows your compute’. This webinar took place on 19 August 2021.

Bioinformatics analyses are often complex, requiring multiple software tools and specialised...

Keywords: Computational Biology, Bioinformatics, High performance computing, HPC, Galaxy Australia, Nectar Research Cloud, Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, NCI, NCMAS, Cloud computing

WEBINAR: Where to go when your bioinformatics outgrows your compute https://dresa.org.au/materials/webinar-where-to-go-when-your-bioinformatics-outgrows-your-compute This record includes training materials associated with the Australian BioCommons webinar ‘Where to go when your bioinformatics outgrows your compute’. This webinar took place on 19 August 2021. Bioinformatics analyses are often complex, requiring multiple software tools and specialised compute resources. “I don’t know what compute resources I will need”, “My analysis won’t run and I don’t know why” and "Just getting it to work" are common pain points for researchers. In this webinar, you will learn how to understand the compute requirements for your bioinformatics workflows. You will also hear about ways of accessing compute that suits your needs as an Australian researcher, including Galaxy Australia, cloud and high-performance computing services offered by the Australian Research Data Commons, the National Compute Infrastructure (NCI) and Pawsey.  We also describe bioinformatics and computing support services available to Australian researchers.  This webinar was jointly organised with the Sydney Informatics Hub at the University of Sydney. Materials are shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International agreement unless otherwise specified and were current at the time of the event. **Files and materials included in this record:** - Event metadata (PDF): Information about the event including, description, event URL, learning objectives, prerequisites, technical requirements etc. - Index of training materials (PDF): List and description of all materials associated with this event including the name, format, location and a brief description of each file. - Where to go when your bioinformatics outgrows your compute - slides (PDF and PPTX): Slides presented during the webinar - Australian research computing resources cheat sheet (PDF): A list of resources and useful links mentioned during the webinar. **Materials shared elsewhere:** A recording of the webinar is available on the Australian BioCommons YouTube Channel: https://youtu.be/hNTbngSc-W0 Melissa Burke (melissa@biocommons.org.au) Computational Biology, Bioinformatics, High performance computing, HPC, Galaxy Australia, Nectar Research Cloud, Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, NCI, NCMAS, Cloud computing
Create a website resume

Written for the Qld Research Bazaar conference 2021, this self paced lesson breaks down how to use Github pages to make a resume, with a simple and basic template to start off with. It discusses how to use Markdown and minimum HTML to customize the template, and offers explanations on how the...

Keywords: personal development, website

Resource type: tutorial, guide

Create a website resume https://dresa.org.au/materials/create-a-website-resume Written for the Qld Research Bazaar conference 2021, this self paced lesson breaks down how to use Github pages to make a resume, with a simple and basic template to start off with. It discusses how to use Markdown and minimum HTML to customize the template, and offers explanations on how the components work together. a.miotto@griffith.edu.au personal development, website
10 Reproducible Research things - Building Business Continuity

The idea that you can duplicate an experiment and get the same conclusion is the basis for all scientific discoveries. Reproducible research is data analysis that starts with the raw data and offers a transparent workflow to arrive at the same results and conclusions. However not all studies are...

Keywords: reproducibility, data management

Resource type: tutorial, video

10 Reproducible Research things - Building Business Continuity https://dresa.org.au/materials/9-reproducible-research-things-building-business-continuity The idea that you can duplicate an experiment and get the same conclusion is the basis for all scientific discoveries. Reproducible research is data analysis that starts with the raw data and offers a transparent workflow to arrive at the same results and conclusions. However not all studies are replicable due to lack of information on the process. Therefore, reproducibility in research is extremely important. Researchers genuinely want to make their research more reproducible, but sometimes don’t know where to start and often don’t have the available time to investigate or establish methods on how reproducible research can speed up every day work. We aim for the philosophy “Be better than you were yesterday”. Reproducibility is a process, and we highlight there is no expectation to go from beginner to expert in a single workshop. Instead, we offer some steps you can take towards the reproducibility path following our Steps to Reproducible Research self paced program. Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bANTr9RvnGg Tutorial: https://guereslib.github.io/ten-reproducible-research-things/ a.miotto@griffith.edu.au; s.stapleton@griffith.edu.au; i.jennings@griffith.edu.au; Sharron Stapleton Isaac Jennings reproducibility, data management masters phd ecr researcher support
Data Storytelling

Nowadays, more information created than our audience could possibly analyse on their own! A study by Stanford professor Chip Heath found that during the recall of speeches, 63% of people remember stories and how they made them feel, but only 5% remember a single statistic. So, you should convert...

Keywords: data storytelling, data visualisation

Data Storytelling https://dresa.org.au/materials/data-storytelling Nowadays, more information created than our audience could possibly analyse on their own! A study by Stanford professor Chip Heath found that during the recall of speeches, 63% of people remember stories and how they made them feel, but only 5% remember a single statistic. So, you should convert your insights and discovery from data into stories to share with non-experts with a language they understand. But how? This tutorial helps you construct stories that incite an emotional response and create meaning and understanding for the audience by applying data storytelling techniques. m.yamaguchi@griffith.edu.au a.miotto@griffith.edu.au data storytelling, data visualisation support masters phd researcher